Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare Management Protocol in Thyroid
Surgery: 4th Consensus Conference of the Italian Association of Endocrine
Surgery Units (U.E.C. CLUB)
Abstract
Purpose
The Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare Management Protocol by the Association of the Italian Endocrine Surgery
Units (U.E.C. CLUB) aims to help treat the patient in a topical, rational way that can be shared by healthcare
professionals.
Methods
This 4th Consensus Conference involved: a selected group of experts in the preliminary phase; all Members, via e-mail,
in the elaboration phase; all the participants to the XI National Congress of the U.E.C. CLUB held in Naples in the final
phase. The following were examined: diagnostic pathway and clinical evaluation; mode of admission and waiting time;
therapeutic pathway (patient preparation for surgery, surgical treatment, postoperative management, management of
major complications); hospital discharge and patient information; outpatient care and follow-up.
Results
A clear and concise style was adopted to illustrate the reasons and scientific rationales behind behaviors and to provide
healthcare professionals with a guide as complete as possible on who, when, how and why to act. The Protocol is meant
to help the surgeon to treat the patient in a topical, rational way that can be shared by healthcare professionals, but
without influencing in any way the physician-patient relationship, which is based on trust and clinical judgment in each
individual case.
Conclusions
The Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare Management Protocol (PDTA) in thyroid surgery approved by the 4th
Consensus Conference (June 2015) is the official PDTA of the Italian Association of Endocrine Surgery Units (U.E.C.
CLUB).
1
Introduction
The Consensus Conference updated the Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare Management Protocol in thyroid
surgery issued by the Italian Association of Endocrine Surgery Units (U.E.C. CLUB), now in its fourth edition.
Members of the U.E.C. CLUB formed the group of experts and compared their clinical experience with the latest
scientific literature. In the preliminary phase, the Consensus Conference involved a selected group of experts; the
elaboration phase was conducted via e-mail among all Members; the conclusion phase took place during the XI
National Congress of the U.E.C. CLUB held in Naples (June 2015).
The objective is to provide the surgeon with Protocols that can be of help for treating the patient in a topical, rational
way that can be shared by healthcare professionals, taking into account important clinical, healthcare and therapeutic
aspects, as well as potential sequelae and complications. A clear and concise style was adopted to illustrate the reasons
and scientific rationales behind behaviors, and to provide healthcare professionals with a guide as complete as possible
on who, when, how and why to act.
However, it is not within the scope of the authors nor of the U.E.C. CLUB to influence in any way the physician-patient
relationship, which is based on trust and clinical judgment in each individual case.
The following were examined:

Diagnostic pathway and clinical evaluation;

Mode of admission and waiting time;

Therapeutic pathway:
-
patient preparation for surgery,
-
surgical treatment,
-
post operative management,
-
prevention and management of major complications;

Hospital discharge and patient information;

Outpatient care and follow-up.
2
Diagnostic pathway and clinical evaluation
In the first place, proper diagnostic workup of surgical thyroid disease encompasses a careful clinical evaluation
(history and physical examination) that, depending on the diagnostic hypothesis, will facilitate subsequent choices as to
the most appropriate laboratory and instrumental studies.
The most relevant events in the medical history include: neck or whole body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation
[1] or exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood or adolescence [2], first degree relatives suffering from
syndromes that include thyroid cancer (Cowden syndrome, familial polyposis, Carney complex, MEN 2, Werner
syndrome, etc.), rapidly growing thyroid nodules, clinical finding of dysphonia. Physical examination should include an
accurate assessment of thyroid and cervical lymph nodes.
The diagnostic workup must be essential and targeted not only to the nosographic definition of the thyroid disease
(laboratory studies), but also to defining the therapeutic strategy and the extension of any potential surgery
(instrumental studies).
The correct diagnostic workup for thyroid disease involves first tier assessments that are necessary for the initial
evaluation, and second tier assessments for further diagnostic evaluation and for defining the therapeutic strategy.
LABORATORY STUDIES

First tier assessments


TSH reflex or screening test. If TSH is abnormal, the laboratory will perform a free T3 and free T4 [3]
Second tier assessments

Calcitonin. Routine measurement of calcitonin in patients with thyroid nodules has the advantage of facilitating
the early diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma and, consequently, of being associated with improved 10year survival of patients with this malignancy [4]. Also in view of these results, some European Consensus
Conferences recommend routine use of calcitonin as screening for medullary thyroid cancer [5,6]. The routine
measurement of calcitonin in patients with nodular thyroid disease remains controversial in the United States,
in view of false-positive results and the resulting low positive predictive value [7,8]. However, in view of the
fact that an early diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma could improve survival and that fine-needle
aspiration cytology does not reliably exclude a diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma [4,5], it is advisable
to routinely determine calcitonin levels prior to thyroidectomy. In the presence of altered baseline calcitonin
levels, it is appropriate to perform a calcium gluconate stimulation test to differentiate between C-cell
3
hyperplasia and medullary thyroid cancer [5]. Stimulated calcitonin levels ≤100 pg/ml do not exclude a
diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma, whereas the likelihood of a medullary thyroid carcinoma is high for
stimulated calcitonin levels > 100 pg/ml. A diagnosis of thyroid medullary carcinoma is almost certain for
stimulated calcitonin levels > 500 pg/ml [5].

Serum calcium. Preoperative measurement of serum calcium is useful for the screening of primary
hyperparathyroidism;

serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH): in case of hypercalcemia;

anti-TPO (anti-thyroid peroxidase) and anti-Tg (anti-thyroglobulin) antibodies: if autoimmune disease is
suspected;

TSH-Receptor Antibody (TRab): if Graves' disease is suspected.
INSTRUMENTAL STUDIES

First tier assessments

Thyroid ultrasound with color flow Doppler scanning [6,7,9-11]:
It must be performed in all patients with a clinical suspicion of thyroid nodule and/or nodular goiter and in all
cases of incidental radiological finding of thyroid nodular disease (CT or MRI of the neck, thyroidal uptake on
18FDG-PET scan, etc.) [5-7]. Ultrasonography allows an accurate morphological evaluation of the thyroid and
adjacent lymph node stations, and the acquisition of pertinent information:
o location, size (possibly total gland volume), structure of the lobes;
o presence, number, size and structure (solid, cystic, mixed) of thyroid nodules;
o vascular pattern of the nodule on color Doppler [10];
o status of the contralateral lobe in case of unilateral disease;
o nodular features indicative of malignancy (hypoechogenicity, microcalcifications, absence of halo, irregular
margins, chaotic intranodular vascularity, round shape);
o condition of the trachea (midline, displaced, compressed);
o status of regional lymph nodes (reactive or suspicious).

Second tier assessments
Second tier assessments are aimed at further diagnostic evaluation and at defining the therapeutic strategy,
particularly in case of minimally invasive approaches and reinterventions:
4

Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS). CEUS represents a promising noninvasive technique for the
differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules. CEUS has rather variable sensitivity (68-100%) and specificity (6794%) [12], likely because the evaluation is operator-dependent.

Thyroid scintigraphy with radioactive iodine uptake test, if necessary. Indications for this investigation have
not changed recently, and are limited to [13,14]:
 subclinical or overt hyperthyroidism,
 recurrent goiter,
 suspicion of forgotten or ectopic goiter.

Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). Accurate and effective technique for the evaluation of thyroid
nodules and their nature. Ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the number of non-diagnostic results and
false negatives [7], especially in the case of nodules with a high likelihood of non-diagnostic cytology (> 2550% cystic component) [15] and/or difficult to palpate or posteriorly located nodules. FNAC is indicated in all
clinically or sonographically suspicious nodules with a diameter >1 cm. It is not recommended as a routine
procedure for subcentimetric nodules; however, for nodules < 1 cm, FNAC is recommended in the following
situations [7]:
 pediatric age,
 family history of thyroid cancer,
 presence of suspicious cervical lymphadenopathy,
 prior radiation therapy to the head, neck and/or mediastinum,
 exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood or adolescence
 nodule with suspicious sonographic features (hypoechogenicity, microcalcifications, marked vascularity),
 follow-up of thyroid cancer treated with thyroid lobectomy plus isthmusectomy,
 thyroid nodule uptake on 18FDG-PET.
The cytology report should be descriptive, but also end with the assignment of the patient to a clearly defined
diagnostic category, identifiable by a numerical code. The 2014 SIAPEC Italian Consensus presents a
cytological classification that differs from the previous one in having introduced, in addition to the Thy1
category (inadequate sampling, to be repeated), the Thy1c category (cystic nodules. Non-diagnostic, but not to
be repeated). The new classification subdivides, in addition, the Thy3 category into:
5


Thy3a (low-risk indeterminate lesion):
-
scant colloid (mainly at the periphery of the smear), vascular tissue, pigmented histiocytes;
-
medium-sized thyrocytes arranged in microfollicular structures (<60%), with no nuclear atypia;
-
smears showing cells with regressive changes.
Thy3b (high-risk indeterminate lesion):
-
scant to absent colloid;
-
microfollicular aggregates of medium-sized thyrocytes (>60%);
-
focal polymorphism, in the absence of nuclear atypia suggestive of papillary thyroid carcinoma;
-
the same microfollicular or trabecular pattern may be formed by oxyphilic cells (oxyphilic follicular
proliferation).
This further subdivision of Thy3 aims at reducing the percentage of nodules with indeterminate cytology to be
submitted to surgery [16]. Immunocytochemical and/or molecular genetic markers can be used to complement
cytology.
Calcitonin, chromogranin A and CEA are used in suspected medullary carcinoma, whereas PTH can detect
parathyroid lesions.
Thyroglobulin and calcitonin measurement in wash-out fluid from fine needle aspiration of thyroid nodules
and/or cervical lymph nodes is a valuable complement to conventional cytology for diagnosing primary or
metastatic thyroid cancer, especially in doubtful or non-diagnostic cases [17,18].

Core needle biopsy (CNB). Tissue biopsy obtained by cutting needle, usually equipped with a retractable
spring-loaded mechanism (18-21 G Trucut needle). This method is carried out only under ultrasound guidance,
and is currently widely used in routine diagnostics. The sampling of tissue that includes the periphery of the
nodule and the surrounding parenchyma allows examining the architectural characteristics of the thyroid
tissue, allowing a microhistological diagnosis. Recently, indications to CNB have been extended to nodules
with inadequate (Thy 1) or indeterminate (Thy 3) cytology [19].

Laringeal fibroscopy. Preoperative fiberoptic laryngoscopy is recommended in all candidates to thyroidectomy
to assess the morphological and functional integrity of the vocal cords. It is necessary:

in the presence of dysphonia,

in re-interventions, to exclude potential pre-existing iatrogenic injury of the inferior laringeal nerve,

in large and/or substernal goiter,

in locally advanced thyroid cancer.
6

CT / MR. To complete the topographic and anatomical diagnostic work-up (without iodinated contrast medium,
in hyperthyroid goiters. The most recent iodinated contrast media interfere much less with iodine therapy and
are necessary to detect infiltration of vessels and trachea, if any) in the case of:
 substernal goiter [20,21];
 residual goiter;
 suspected invasive cancer, to detect invasion of surrounding structures, if present;
 complex recurrences.

124-I-PET. Recent studies have shown greater diagnostic reliability of 124-I-PET versus the "traditional" 131I
whole-body scintigraphy in differentiated thyroid cancer and, most importantly, a high number of cases with
negative scintigraphy but positive PET was observed. New radiopharmaceuticals that could further improve
the performance of 124-I-PET are being studied [22].

18F-FDG PET-CT. 18F-FDG PET-CT can be useful in case of elevated thyroglobulin levels potentially due to
local and/or distant recurrence, in case of suspicious lesions without 131I uptake. This technique, used for the
staging of many cancers, may incidentally reveal areas of increased uptake within the thyroid "incidentalomas" - that, in 25% of cases, turn out to be cancer. At present, 18F-FDG PET-CT cannot be
considered a routine investigation [23,24].
Elastography. Elastography measures the degree of distortion of a tissue subjected to an external force, and can
therefore determine the elasticity of the tissue being examined. Malignant lesions often associate with changes
in tissue mechanical properties, therefore this technique may help refine the diagnosis of the lesion being
examined. However, the applicability of elastography in clinical practice is limited by the variable sensitivity
(54-69%) and specificity (60-96%) described in different reports [25].
Mode of admission and waiting time

PRIORITY FOR HOSPITAL ADMISSION:
 high: within 1 month, for confirmed and/or advanced cancer;
 intermediate: within 3 months for suspected cancer or in the case of poor compliance to thyrostatic treatment;
 low: 12 months for stabilized euthyroid and hyperthyroid benign disease.

PRE-ADMISSION WORKUP (or upon admission):

Blood chemistry, complete blood count and coagulation tests for surgery;
7

ECG;

Chest X-ray (where indicated, depending on patient's age and comorbidities);

Anesthesiology consultation;

ENT consultation for the assessment of vocal cord mobility (preferably by means of fiberoptic laryngoscopy):
recommended in all patients; mandatory for re-interventions, substernal goiter, thyroid malignancy.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PATIENTS:

Patients should continue their current thyroid medications (methimazole, propylthiouracil, thyroxine, betablockers taken on a regular basis) until the day prior to surgery, unless otherwise indicated due to medical or
anesthesiological reasons [26];

As for every surgical procedure, in patients with cardiovascular disease discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy which may be substituted with low molecular weight heparins at least one week prior to surgery - needs to be
balanced against the severity of the comorbidity,

ADMISSION:
On the same day of surgery, unless otherwise indicated or required.
Therapeutic pathway
Patient preparation for surgery

ANTIBIOTICS: antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated in thyrodectomy [3,27], except for particular cases, such
as: severe diabetes, cardiac valvular disease, immune deficiency (hemodialysis or transplant patients).

ANTITHROMBOTIC PROPHYLAXIS: international guidelines [3,28] do not make specific recommendations
regarding thyroid or neck surgery. Guideline indications for thromboprophylaxis in general surgery are as follows:
-
Low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for surgery lasting >45 minutes and in patients aged >40 years;
-
Use of appropriate graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression in the presence of
venous thromboembolism risk factors.
There is no consensus among endocrine surgeons on the indications for thromboprophylaxis with LMWH, because
of the high risk associated with the development of a postoperative cervical hematoma.

SKIN DISINFECTION: thorough cleaning of the skin. Some authors suggest using non-iodine disinfectants to
avoid affecting postoperative scintigraphy to be performed in case cancer is found.
8

BLOOD UNITS: autologous predeposit blood donation or preparation of blood units for thyroidectomy is not
justified.

POSITION ON THE OPERATING TABLE (joint responsibility of the surgeon and anesthesiologist):

patient in the supine position with a small wedge beneath the shoulders, at the scapular level, such to allow a
mild hyperextension of the neck;

with the neck in hyperextension, although mild, arms should be adducted and secured next to the patient's body
in order to avoid rare, but severe and sometimes irreversible, brachial plexus paralyses due to stretch injury
[29];


elbows should be adequately padded to avoid ulnar nerve paralysis secondary to compression;

eye protection to avoid corneal ulceration and ocular trauma.
INFORMED CONSENT:
Patients should be adequately informed by the surgeon of the indications for surgery, possible alternative
treatments, advantages expected from surgery, general and specific complications, rehabilitation therapy – if
needed, and the clinical consequences of potential permanent postoperative injuries.
The information provided should be clearly explained, complete and prompt. After providing the most complete
information, the physician will seek the patient’s consent to perform surgery, taking into full consideration any
expression of dissent, even on individual aspects of the procedure or its potential consequences.
Transmission of information and the informed consent should preliminarily take place during the first visit and be
renewed upon admission, before surgery, especially if enough time has passed such that the initial conditions may
have changed. In fact, the patient must be given the opportunity to discuss in depth with his/her physician (or other
trusted person) the information received and, if desired, to get information on the health facility where he or she
will be treated and/or on the team that will perform the surgery.
Given the peculiarity of the therapeutic intervention (partial or total removal of the thyroid gland) and its potential
consequences on the physical integrity of the subject [30], it is necessary that written documentation of the
informed and conscious consent be retained, and that the informed consent process be documented in a specific
chart note.
To this end, the following consent form is adopted that should be personalized and signed off both by the patient
and the physician each time:
9
INFORMED CONSENT TO MEDICAL TREATMENT FORM
I, the undersigned,
manner by Dr.
declare having been informed in a clear and understandable
, both at initial visit and at admission, that surgery is indicated for
the condition I was diagnosed with, i.e.
.
The scope, benefits (also relative to alternative treatments), possible risks and/or foreseeable injuries of
the surgical procedure have been clearly explained to me.
It has been explained to me that, if ultrasound and/or scintigraphic findings will be confirmed
intraoperatively, the surgery will consist of total or sub-total (if necessary) removal of the thyroid
gland.
I have been informed that this procedure may involve:
 Transient or permanent injury to the laryngeal nerves that innervate the vocal cords, with potentially
severe voice alterations (about 4% of cases, 2% of which are transient and disappear within a
maximum of one year, but 1-2% are permanent). In case of bilateral laryngeal nerve injury (0.6%),
breathing difficulties may arise that may necessitate tracheotomy (with an incidence of 0.3%),
which is nearly always temporary. Voice alterations may include hoarseness, breathy, diplophonic
(double-toned), or high-pitched voice, as well as changes in timbre, tone, extension, intensity and
fatigue in vocal use, with singing difficulties. Difficulty swallowing liquids that is usually transient
may accompany these alterations;
 transient or permanent injury to the parathyroid glands, with subsequent alterations in serum
calcium and phosphorus levels requiring lifelong calcium and vitamin D supplementation (this
condition occurs in approximately 3% of cases);
 postoperative bleeding that could require urgent reintervention for hemostasis:
 surgical wound infection;
 alterations and changes of the voice that are associated with postoperative scarring and adhesions
between neck (prethyroidal) muscles and the larynx, and may occur even in the absence of nerve
injury and vocal cord paralysis;
 possible onset of mild to moderate fatigue in the postoperative period following total thyroidectomy
(up to 25% of cases);
 possible presence of a gland remnant after surgey or non-removal of ectopic nodules, even after
total thyroidectomy (2-4% of cases).
The surgeon has sufficiently informed me about the incidence of these complications (also referring to
his/her own experience), and has explained to me that surgery, particularly thyroid surgery, cannot be
considered as devoid of risks even when performed with rigorous technique, since the laryngeal nerves
and parathyroid glands may be temporarily or permanently injured due to causes (nerve exposure,
scarring, cold- or heat-induced damage, vascular damage and other unknown causes) that are
independent of a correct performance of the surgical procedure. I have also been told that I will require
lifelong thyroid hormone replacement therapy, especially if I will have my entire thyroid removed, and
that I will have a surgical scar on my neck.
In any case, I am aware that if the need to rescue me from an immediate, otherwise unavoidable danger
arises that could cause serious injury to myself, or if difficulties are encountered with the planned
technique during surgery, the surgical team will perform all the procedures they deem necessary to
prevent or reduce the harm, and to conclude the surgical procedure in the safest conditions, changing
the nature of the planned procedure, if needed.
10
Now, therefore, I hereby declare that I have been asked to read carefully the content of this two-page
form, which actually corresponds to what I have been extensively told. I hereby declare that I
understand the meaning of what has been explained to me and that I do not need further clarifications
beyond those I already asked for, which I have written with my own hand below:
......................................................................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................................................................
Now, therefore, I consciously consent / do not consent to the proposed surgical procedure.
I am aware that I may withdraw this consent at any time, by telling the physicians in charge of my care.
Patient’s legible signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physician’s legible signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P.S.: I hereby authorize / do not authorize the physicians in charge of my care to treat to the best of
their knowledge and belief other conditions discovered during surgery and not previously diagnosed,
but requiring non-deferrable treatment due to urgent or potentially life-threatening situations, being
aware that the surgical plan originally proposed and agreed upon might have to be modified.
Patient’s legible signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physician’s legible signature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Date and time
11

INDICATIONS.
Surgical thyroid disease mainly includes thyroid malignancies and dysplastic-hyperplastic focal or diffuse thyroid
disease, hyperthyroidism and, marginally, thyroiditis.
Thyroid malignancy encompasses a diverse group of cancers characterized by a considerable diversity as to biology and
prognosis. Most malignant thyroid neoplasms arise from follicular cells: papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma,
poorly differentiated and undifferentiated (anaplastic) carcinoma. Other neoplasms arise from thyroid parafollicular
cells or C cells (medullary carcinoma) and, finally, a minority of thyroid neoplasms arise from thyroid mesenchymal
cells (malignant lymphoma, sarcoma, etc.).
Benign surgical thyroid conditions include all conditions characterized by alterations in the morphology and/or function
of the gland. In this context, diagnostic procedures are aimed at clarifying the nature of the thyroid disease and at
defining all the morphological and functional alterations of the gland, taking into account the different treatment options
available. An indication for surgery should take into account the results of diagnostic testing and localization studies,
possible conservative treatment options and potential complications of surgery.
Specific diagnostic procedures may be required to better plan the surgical intervention, such as preoperative
ultrasonography performed by the surgeon, which can be useful in assessing the extent of surgery needed [31,32].
Careful postoperative follow-up should be planned for prompt detection of any complications or sequelae.
The main surgical indications for thyroid disease include:
 Suspected or confirmed malignancy;
 Severe compressive disease (dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea);
 rapid volumetric growth;
 substernal goiter;
 deviated/compressed trachea and/or oesophagus;
 toxic goiter (uni- /multinodular);
 Graves' disease resistant to medical therapy and/or with severe ophthalmopathy [33];
 RET gene mutation.
Surgical treatment
Of all the procedures that have been proposed for thyroid surgery, the following can be considered current (3):

lobectomy plus isthmusectomy [34];
12

total thyroidectomy (considered as synonym for near-total thyroidectomy in the Anglo-Saxon meaning, as the
presence of remnants, although minimal, is pretty much constant, without affecting the radicality of the
intervention) [35];

subtotal thyroidectomy with unilateral remnant: its use is limited in clinical practice, due to the increased
incidence of relapses that burdens it and the risk of inadequate treatment of thyroid carcinomas discovered
incidentally. Given these disadvantages, it is controversial whether there is a benefit in terms of postoperative
complications compared to total thyroidectomy [36-38].
The surgical report must be accurate and provide a description of the thyroid gland and the macroscopic
characteristics of the most relevant nodules.
The surgeon should also report on the identification and preservation of the external branch of the superior
laryngeal nerve [39]; on the identification and preservation of the lower laryngeal nerves, mentioning dissection
difficulties, if any; on parathyroid glands, specifying their location, morphology and preservation of anatomical
integrity and blood supply.
A decision to leave macroscopic thyroid remnants in situ should be substantiated, and location and size of the
remnants should be specified.


Technical requirements that define a lobectomy plus isthmusectomy:

total extracapsular removal of a lobe plus the isthmus and the pyramid, if present;

identification and / or preparation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve;

preservation of the vascular and anatomical integrity of the parathyroid glands;

preservation of the anatomical integrity of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve.
Technical requirements that define a total thyroidectomy:

total extracapsular removal of the thyroid plus the pyramid, if present;

identification and/or preparation of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of both sides;

preservation of the vascular and anatomical integrity of the parathyroid glands of both sides;

preservation of the anatomical integrity of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerves of both
sides.

Technical requirements that define a subtotal thyroidectomy with unilateral remnant:

total extracapsular removal of a lobe plus the isthmus and the pyramid, if present, leaving behind a
remnant of the contralateral lobe. This technique involves leaving behind a minimal amount of thyroid
tissue at the level of Berry’s ligament, in order to avoid injury to the superior parathyroid gland and/or the
recurrent nerve as it enters the larynx underneath the inferior constrictor muscle [35-38].
13

identification and/or preparation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve of one side and
exposure of the
contralateral nerve;

preservation of the vascular and anatomical integrity of the parathyroid glands of both sides;

preservation of the anatomical integrity of the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerves of both
sides.

Minimally invasive techniques
After the first endoscopic subtotal parathyroidectomy [40] described in 1996, several techniques have been
developed for minimally invasive thyroidectomy [41]. Minimally invasive approaches for thyroidectomy can
be classified into techniques with and without the use of an endoscope. The latter (MIT; minimal incision
thyroidectomy) differ from conventional thyroidectomy by a shorter skin incision, and involve the use of
optical aids (magnifying glasses x2.5-3.5) [42] to achieve the advantages of optical magnification that is
provided by the endoscope.
Techniques that involve using an endoscope can be divided into pure endoscopic techniques and video-assisted
techniques.
An important limitation of endoscopic techniques is the difficulty of purely endoscopic dissection, especially
when using accesses that are completely different from those used in conventional surgery (axillary, breast,
chest access), which limited their use to the authors who have proposed them [41,43].
Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) is a totally gasless technique that involves a 1.52.0 cm central horizontal incision, use of a 5 mm 30 degree endoscope and dedicated dissection tools [44,45].
This technique has large consensus and is safe and reproducible, with similar complications as compared to
conventional surgery and significant advantages in terms of postoperative pain and discomfort, as well as of
the aesthetic outcome [46,47].
Indications to MIVAT [48-50]:

nodules with a maximum diameter of 35 mm;

thyroid volume ≤30 ml;

low- and intermediate-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma [48,50];

patients with RET gene mutation.
Absolute contraindications:

prior neck surgery (except for completion thyroidectomy) [44];

locally advanced thyroid carcinoma;
14

preoperative evidence of lymph node metastases. Although it has been shown that the outcomes of videoassisted central compartment lymph node dissection (level VI) are, in selected cases, similar to those
achieved with the conventional technique in terms of oncological radicality [49], preoperative evidence of
level VI lymph node metastases is currently a contraindication to the video-assisted approach.
Relative contraindications:

prior neck irradiation;

thyroiditis or Graves’ disease.
Certain patient anthropometric characteristics, such as obesity and a short neck, are considered as
contraindications to video-assisted thyroidectomy by some Authors [51].

Robotic thyroidectomy
Use of robotic technology in the head and neck area allows several indirect approaches to the thyroid bed:
gasless transaxillary (the most used) [52], transoral [53], retroauricular [54], and axillo-breast [55] approach.
Indications:

benign disease: nodules ≤5 cm, follicular nodules, Graves’ disease;

malignancy: well-differentiated cancer (in the absence of extensive experience, the robotic approach
should be limited to small differentiated carcinomas with no preoperative evidence of cervical
lymphadenopathy) [56-59].
Contraindications:

autoimmune disease, as periglandular adhesions and increased vascularization may make the robotic
surgical procedure difficult;

prior thyroid or breast surgery;

prior irradiation to the head and neck area;

electronic medical devices (pacemakers, defibrillators) in the pectoral region.
Relative contraindications:
arthrosis or previous surgery of the shoulder joint, because of the positioning of the upper limb during this
type of surgery;
BMI (Body Mass Index) >30 [59]. Furthermore, if the distance from the axilla to the sternal notch is more
than 15 cm, creating the tunnel may be more difficult [59].
15

Intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring (IONM)
Lower laryngeal nerve injury is one of the most feared complications after thyroidectomy, and medical
litigation is increasingly frequent [3,60-62]. Further, it is known that anatomical nerve integrity does not
necessarily imply functional integrity and, therefore, not all nerve injuries are recognized intraoperatively
[63,64].
Several techniques have been proposed for intraoperative monitoring of the recurrent nerve (Intraoperative
Nerve Monitoring: IONM), but the most widespread and standardized method involves using endotracheal
tube surface electrodes, that are placed in contact with the mucosa of the vocal cords [65,66]. The use of
IONM may be associated with a benefit in terms of transient recurrent laryngeal nerve injury [67]. However,
despite a sensitivity >90% [66], the specificity varies widely (30-80%) [65,66,68,69] and the rate of false
positives is high. Selective use of IONM has been proposed for high-risk patients (reinterventions,
malignancy, and substernal goiter) based on improvements in postoperative outcomes [70], but this has not
been confirmed in other reports [71].
Thus, intraoperative use of IONM can be regarded as an adjunct in selected cases, but cannot replace
meticulous surgical technique based on the knowledge of the anatomy of the nerve and its variants.
More promising results are expected from the continuous monitoring of the vagus nerve (Continuous vagal
IONM: CIONM), which allows real-time evaluation of the recurrent nerve during surgical maneuvers and,
therefore, could facilitate the prevention of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries [72].
SURGICAL TREATMENT OF HYPERTHYROIDISM

Isolated toxic adenoma: lobectomy plus isthmusectomy, especially for nodules ≥3 cm, compressive symptoms,
poor patient compliance to radioiodine therapy [73].

Toxic multinodular goiter: total thyroidectomy [73];

Flajani-Basedow-Graves’ disease: total thyroidectomy (indicated in case of intolerance, ineffectiveness or
recurrency after thyrostatic treatment or when radioiodine therapy is contraindicated due to large thyroid size,
compressive symptoms, young patient age and/or thyroid nodular disease). Presence of severe ophthalmopathy
is another indication for surgery [33,73].
SURGICAL TREATMENT OF EUTHYROIDISM
16

Unilateral nodular disease (negative cytology; normal contralateral lobe): lobectomy plus isthmusectomy
[74].

Multinodular goiter: total thyroidectomy [36,37].
❑ SURGICAL TREATMENT OF SUBSTERNAL GOITER
By definition, a substernal goiter extends into the mediastinum by at least 50% of its volume. The incidence is
reported to be between 1% and 30%. Being influenced by the anatomical situation due to intrathoracic extension of
the goiter, surgical procedures are burdened with a greater incidence of complications [75,76]. Substernal goiter is
classified as primary (very rare, originating from ectopic mediastinal thyroid tissue, with no connection to the
cervical thyroid gland, and blood supply from branches of the aorta, the innominate artery or the internal mammary
artery) or secondary (originating from the thyroid, with preserved vascular, parenchymal or fibrous connection to the
gland). Substernal goiter should be treated by total thyroidectomy through cervical access, which is possible in 90%
of cases [75-77]. Additional sternotomy and/or thoracotomy are necessary for malignancies with local infiltration of
the mediastinum, for rare cases of primary substernal goiter [75,76] or when the mediastinal and/or retrovascular
component of the goiter is such to make removal through the cervical incision dangerous or impossible.
SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THYROID MALIGNANCY:

Differentiated carcinoma (papillary and follicular). Surgery should ensure radicality, with removal of all tumor
foci and minimal incidence of postoperative complications.
The extent of thyroidectomy (hemithyroidectomy versus total thyroidectomy) for differentiated thyroid
carcinoma is subject to debate, as high-level evidence favoring a more aggressive surgical approach in terms of
recurrence risk reduction and absolute survival is lacking [78]. A well-performed total thyroidectomy is
associated with a relatively low incidence of complications, ensures good local control of cancer by removing
even microscopic tumor foci (that are frequent and often bilateral), facilitates subsequent radiometabolic
treatment and allows using serum thyroglobulin monitoring for follow-up. On the other hand,
hemithyroidectomy may be proposed because of the relatively low risk of recurrence in exchange for half the
postoperative complications of total thyroidectomy [78]. Based on the available literature, it seems reasonable
to consider total thyroidectomy as the treatment of choice for most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer,
whereas a lobectomy plus isthmusectomy may be adequate for patients with unifocal noninfiltrating papillary
microcarcinoma, no lymph node involvement and non aggressive histology [3,7,79].

Medullary carcinoma: For the treatment of the tumor, total thyroidectomy is the only potentially curative
treatment [3,5,7,80], for both sporadic (70%) and hereditary (30%) forms, either isolated or as part of a
17
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: MEN 2A or Sipple’s syndrome (in association with pheochromocytoma and
hyperparathyroidism); MEN 2B or Gorlin-Steinert syndrome (in association with pheochromocytoma, a
ganglioneuromatosis and marfanoid habitus). If medullary carcinoma is associated with pheochromocytoma,
adrenalectomy must be planned and performed prior to or at the same time as thyroidectomy, after appropriate
pharmacological preparation of the patient. If present, parathyroid disease will be treated during
thyroidectomy. For lymphadenectomy, please refer to the appropriate section.

Undifferentiated or anaplastic carcinoma.
Due to high aggressiveness, this cancer has an unfavorable prognosis in most cases (median survival of
approximately 5 months). However, a reduction in its incidence has been reported in recent years, partly
related to early diagnosis that allows treatment of the differentiated histological types in the initial stages.
When anaplastic carcinoma is suspected, clinical and instrumental assessment of disease by a multidisciplinary
team (surgeon, pathologist, oncologist, radiation oncologist, radiologist) is pivotal for the evaluation of
treatment options and advantages/disadvantages of the proposed treatments. The clinical onset is generally
characterized by extensive local infiltration and/or distant metastases, although incidental findings on final
pathology report are not rare.
All anaplastic thyroid cancers are considered as stage IV (AJCC / UICC): stage IVa and b patients may be
potential candidates for a multimodal treatment including a more or less radical surgical resection associated
with radio- and chemotherapy, which, in some cases, allows subsequent surgical re-exploration for local
disease control. In patients with stage IVc, treatment options remain limited and controversial. Treatment is
mostly palliative (tracheostomy or tracheal esophageal stent), with the intent of improving patient quality of
life as much as possible [81].

LYMPHADENECTOMY

Differentiated carcinoma. Regional lymph node metastases at diagnosis are reported in 30-60% of patients
[82,83]. The prognostic significance of lymph node involvement and, consequently, indications for and the
extent of lymphadenectomy are still subject to debate [82,83]. Lymph node metastases are associated with
increased risk of disease recurrence and reduced survival [84]. For this reason, when lymph node
metastases are found pre- or intraoperatively, therapeutic lymphadenectomy extended to the levels
involved is indicated [7]: level VI neck dissection if lymph nodes of the central compartment are involved;
18
lateral cervical lymphadenectomy if lateral cervical lymph node levels are involved (ipsi- and/or
bilaterally).
The role and extent of prophylactic lymphadenectomy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, in the absence
of pre- and intra-operative evidence of lymph node involvement (cN0) is still debated [78].
It is known that prophylactic central neck dissection may be associated with an increased risk of
postoperative complications (hypoparathyroidism and recurrent nerve injury), with no high-level scientific
evidence confirming its benefits. However, it has potential benefits: reduction of disease recurrence and
postoperative serum thyroglobulin levels, more accurate disease staging and selection of patients in whom
radioiodine treatment is indicated [78].
Although tumor size is considered as one of the risk factors for occult lymph node metastases to the
central compartment, it has been shown that microcarcinomas behave like larger tumors as to biological
aggressiveness and risk of local (lymph node) and/or distant metastases [85]. In conclusion, there are no
preoperative parameters (age, gender, tumor size) to confidently identify an “at risk” population who could
benefit from a prophylactic central neck dissection [86].
Prophylactic ipsilateral central neck dissection with or without intraoperative pathology consultation on
the nodes removed has been proposed for clinically unifocal and cN0 tumors, in order to reduce the risk of
complications associated with prophylactic central neck dissection [82,87-89].
Prophylactic lateral neck dissection in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not indicated.
Ipsilateral or bilateral therapeutic functional lateral neck dissection (level II-III-IV-V lymph nodes) should
be performed, if node metastases have been documented (ultrasonography, cytology, Tg measurement in
washout fluid from fine-needle aspiration, intraoperative pathology consultation) [7]. Lateral neck
dissection must be complete (level II, III, IV and V lymph nodes), compartment-oriented and nonselective, i.e. not limited to macroscopically involved levels [5,7].
-
Medullary carcinoma: medullary carcinoma is characterized by early and variable metastatic spread to
lymph nodes in the central (50-81%) and lateral (34-81%) compartment [90]. Clearly, a careful neck
dissection, where indicated, is crucial in the treatment of this cancer. Minimum treatment for tumors > 5
cm is total thyroidectomy associated with central neck dissection (level VI) [91]. However, indications for
and extent of lateral neck dissection remain controversial [5,80]. In fact, there is no consensus on
recommending bilateral prophylactic dissection of lymph nodes in the lateral compartments in the recent
guidelines by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) (Recommendation 25) [80]. Proposed approaches
include: prophylactic bilateral neck dissection in the case of palpable tumors and/or node metastases in the
19
ipsilateral lateral neck and/or high calcitonin levels (> 200 pg/ml) [5,80]; prophylactic ipsilateral lateral
neck dissection in the case of palpable tumors and/or moderately increased calcitonin levels (between 20
and 200 pg/ml) [5,80]; therapeutic ipsilateral lateral neck dissection, in the case of preoperative and/or
intraoperative evidence of lymph node metastases in the lateral compartment [5,80,92,93].

Anaplastic carcinoma. For patients being treated with radical intent, neck dissection should be considered
if nodes are involved [81].

DRAINAGE. The use of wound drains after thyroid surgery is widely practiced, despite several studies
showing no real benefit in controlling postoperative bleeding [94]. Nevertheless, a potential benefit of drains –
suction drains would be preferable - should be assessed in relation to the clinical situation.

HISTOLOGICAL EXAMINATION. Definitive histology of the gland after surgical removal is mandatory.
Orienting the specimen with a surgical suture placed at the upper pole of the right lobe is always recommended
to facilitate the histological description. The surgeon should not cut the specimen to avoid affecting
macroscopic examination by the pathologist.
Intraoperative consultation could be useful to confirm suspicious nodules (Thy 4 on cytology, according to
SIAPEC 2014 Classification) [16] or node metastases. It is not useful for nodules with indeterminate follicular
cytology (SIAPEC 2014 Classification) [16] because it is generally non-diagnostic [95].
Postoperative management
Postoperative management should be provided by qualified medical and nursing staff that is trained to promptly
recognize and treat possible complications, such as dyspnea, bleeding and hypocalcemic crisis.
NURSING CARE:

Check of the surgical dressing, which should be small in size to avoid delays in the detection of neck
swelling due to blood accumulation;

monitoring of drains, if any, for patency and proper functioning;

blood pressure monitoring;

urgent notification of the on-call physician in case of:
o
abundant blood loss from drains;
20


o
progressive cervical swallening;
o
onset of agitation, dyspnea, feeling of tightness around neck;
o
clinical signs of hypocalcemia (paresthesias, Trousseau’s signs);
postoperative monitoring of serum calcium and/or PTH after total thyroidectomy.
MEDICAL CARE:

If a cervical hematoma with compressive symptoms develops, dressing and cutaneous, subcutaneous and
muscle sutures should be immediately removed, even at the bedside if the patient’s conditions warrant it, to
allow for decompression. The operating room should be prepared for re-exploration of the thyroid bed and
optimization of hemostasis, if indicated;


wound check and drain removal prior to discharge;
if worsening symptomatic hypocalcemia (paresthesias, tetanic crisis) develops despite oral therapy, urgent
serum calcium measurement should be ordered and calcium gluconate infused i.v.

for the treatment of asymptomatic hypocalcemia, please refer to the next paragraph (see Prevention and
Management of major complications - HYPOPARATHYROIDISM)

hormone replacement therapy with levothyroxine at adequate dosage based on weight, age and extent of
thyroidectomy (lobectomy plus isthmusectomy versus total thyroidectomy), in all cases. Individual adjustment
of levothyroxine dosage should be guided by fT4 and TSH levels, measured approximately 40 days after
surgery. In the case of an incidental histologic finding of malignancy, the protocol for cancer will be
implemented, when the endocrinologist and or the nuclear medicine physician deem complementary
radioiodine therapy necessary.
Prevention and management of major complications
COMPRESSIVE HEMATOMA:
Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is a serious complication that can lead to severe consequences such as hypoxia,
neurological disorders and death [3,60]. The term "compressive hematoma" is well known in the medical literature,
and indicates possible airway compromise. Risk factors may be related to the patient, the thyroid disease and the
surgeon [60]. Risk factors related to the patient essentially include a history of coagulopathy (hemophilia, von
Willebrand disease, chronic renal failure and hemodialysis, liver diseases, etc.) and use of anticoagulants or
21
antiplatelet agents. As for the risk associated with thyroid disease, a toxic goiter and Graves' disease are presumed
risk factors for postoperative bleeding. Substernal, intrathoracic or recurrent goiters are also at risk of postoperative
bleeding [60,96].
Surgeon-related risks are associated with correct performance of the surgical technique [60]. Even the surgical
access may be a source of bleeding, due to section of strap muscles and partial resection of thyroid tissue, as well as
to injury to the anterior jugular veins [96]. Simulation of Valsalva maneuver by the anesthesiologist during the
hemostasis phase can be useful, as it may reveal potential sources of venous bleeding. Incomplete closure of the
strap muscles, leaving a marginal “weep hole”, is a measure that allows spontaneous decompression of the
hematoma in case of bleeding [97]. If symptomatic hematoma develops, early diagnosis, immediate reopening of the
wound and surgical revision are necessary. Clot removal and optimization of hemostasis are the definitive treatment
for this potentially lethal complication, and are to be preferred to prolonged observation. Conservative treatment
should only be considered for asymptomatic and self-limiting hematomas.
HYPOPARATHYROIDISM:

If inadvertent devascularization or accidental removal of a parathyroid occurs during surgery, the gland should
be reimplanted into a pocket in the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle, after cutting the gland into pieces
with a scalpel so as to allow for wider contact surface with the muscle, and possibly after examining a frozen
section to confirm – in case of doubt - parathyroid tissue and absence of pathologic hyperplasia [3,98]. In order
to prevent the development of hematomas that may impair tissue functional recovery, after careful hemostasis
the muscular pocket should be closed using a non-absorbable thread (e.g. Prolene 2-0 or 3-0) that can serve as
a landmark if removal of the transplant is necessary in the future (onset of hyperparathyroidism, either primary
or secondary to chronic renal failure) [3,98].

An incision in the parathyroid capsule may be useful in the case of venous congestion for decompression.

The onset of symptomatic hypocalcemia despite oral calcium carbonate and vitamin D supplementation
mandates, after measuring serum calcium, intravenous administration of two 10 ml vials (2 g) of calcium
gluconate diluted in 250 ml of normal saline, until symptoms have resolved.

There is no consensus on the preoperative prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D to suppress
the risk of postoperative symptomatic hypocalcemia [99,100].

Based on recent evidence [101,102], combined assessment of postoperative PTH and serum calcium levels
may be useful to modulate the treatment of patients with postoperative hypocalcemia (≤ 8 mg/dl). In the
presence of normal PTH levels, hypocalcemia is usually controlled with oral calcium carbonate (2-6 g) given
22
in at least three daily administrations. When hypocalcemia is associated with low PTH levels, calcium
carbonate supplementation should be associated with calcitriol (0.50 to 1.5 mcg/day); treatment can be taken at
home with weekly monitoring of serum calcium and progressive reduction of dosages, where possible [103].
Calcium supplements with added sodium should be avoided in elderly and hypertensive patients.
TRANSIENT OR PERMANENT INJURY TO THE RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE [3,60]

Sections of the recurrent laryngeal nerve that are recognized intraoperatively can be repaired using
microsurgical reconstruction techniques. Nerve reconstruction can be done using end-to-end or fascicular
neurorrhaphy, or using a graft. The anastomosis between the inferior laryngeal nerve and the loop of the
hypoglossal nerve, and in particular the terminal branch to the sternothyroid muscle, has also been described.
These techniques, however, do not restore vocal cord motility; they can help improve tone and muscle
trophism of the vocal cords, sometimes with positive effects on the phonatory and ventilatory function [104].

In the event of respiratory distress due to bilateral vocal cord paralysis at the time of extubation, immediate
tracheotomy should be avoided and the patient should be kept intubated for the following 24 hours. Only then
extubation will be attempted, with fiberoptic assistance to check that mobility of at least one vocal cord has
recovered.

Persistence of bilateral paralysis mandates maintaining intubation for additional 24 hours.

Tracheotomy is recommended if bilateral paralysis in adduction further persists.

Tracheotomy is not necessary for phonatory bilateral paralysis with an adequate airway (cords in the
paramedian position), but speech therapy should be started, according to indications by the ENT
surgeon/phoniatrist.

Unilateral vocal cord paralysis usually only needs to be treated with speech therapy, according to indications
by the ENT surgeon/phoniatrist, and after examining iconographic documentation (video recordings of the
fiberoptic laryngoscopy).

Concomitant dysphagia to liquids, which is often associated with inhaling disturbances, mandates adding
thickening agents to liquids, which are easier to swallow when turned into jelly.

In all instances, clinical observations and proposed and/or administered treatments must be accurately recorded
on the patient’s chart.
Hospital discharge and patient information
23
Patients are informed of their expected date of discharge one day in advance. On the appointed day, following medical
examination, wound care and measurement of serum calcium in case of total thyroidectomy, discharge is confirmed and
the patient is provided with relevant clinical documentation.
Timing
One-day surgery is possible only for patients undergoing thyroid lobectomy plus isthmusectomy, provided that patient
history, clinical and family situation as well as logistics allow it [105].
Some authors have proposed one-day surgery also for patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for benign disease
[106,107]. Day surgery and even more so, outpatient surgery, is discouraged [105,108].
In this type of surgery, in addition to immediate complications, postoperative hypocalcemia should be taken into
account. Calcium supplementation in all patients who have undergone total thyroidectomy, regardless of serum calcium
levels [99,100,109,110], may be an overtreatment and represent an additional cost [101]; further, it could cause
iatrogenic hypercalcemia [111].
Patient information
HOSPITAL DISCHARGE SUMMARY
Upon discharge, the patient should be provided with a comprehensive clinical report (a copy should be included in the
patient’s chart) addressed to the primary care physician, signed off by the attending physician who discharges the
patient, and containing the following essential information:

date of admission and admit diagnosis;

main diagnostic (laboratory and instrumental) investigations performed during the hospital stay, with particular
emphasis on those with altered results;

date and description of the surgical procedure, with reporting of any intra-operative difficulties encountered and
reimplantation of parathyroid tissue, if performed;

description of the postoperative course, with accurate highlighting of any complications (hemorrhage, dyspnea,
dysphagia, dysphonia, hypocalcemia, etc.);

pharmacological treatments administered to the patient;

discharge diagnosis (final pathology report, if available);

medications on discharge, clearly indicating posology and method of administration;

patient education on how to manage the surgical wound and promptly recognize symptoms of hypocalcemia;
24

recommended and/or scheduled clinical and/or diagnostic follow up;

follow-up ENT/phoniatrics follow-up visit in the case of dysphonia, and rehabilitation program if altered vocal cord
mobility is documented;

direct phone number of the hospital/clinic.
After discharge, the patient is attended by the primary care physician. For individuals who reside in a different Region,
discussing possible issues related to means of transport, length and type of travel with the patient or her/his family could
be useful to establish the most appropriate timing for discharge and to give proper advice.
Practical advice upon discharge. – It may be useful to provide the patient with a leaflet containing practical information
on self-management of recovery and contact information for use in case of need for advice. The form proposed and
adopted by the U.E.C. CLUB is as follows:
25
Practical advice after thyroidectomy
In case of partial thyroidectomy (i.e. when only a portion of the thyroid is removed) adequate
intake of thyroid hormone and monitoring of thyroid function tests are recommended to prevent
hypertrophy of the residual thyroid tissue, the development of other nodules or a recurrent goiter.
In case of total thyroidectomy (complete removal of the gland) administration of the required dose of
thyroid hormone, adjusted based on thyroid function tests, is mandatory.
Levothyroxine tablets should be taken every day in the morning, on an empty stomach (approximately 20
minutes before breakfast); the dose of thyroid hormone replacement will be monitored periodically, on
medical prescription, with the following blood tests: fT4, TSH (the tablet should not be taken on the
morning of the blood draw). It is the endocrinologist who should establish the right dosage.
If the operated patient forgets to take the levothyroxine tablet for one to a few days there will be no
consequences, and the daily dosage should not be changed in the attempt to compensate for the missed
doses. In case of extreme necessity, thyroid hormone stores in the body are such to provide availability of
thyroid hormone, although progressively decreasing, for up to a month; the patient will gradually experience
symptoms of hormone deficiency (fatigue, tiredness, listlessness, sleepiness).
The surgical scar can be considered fully healed, also from an aesthetic standpoint, only after about three
months. In the weeks following surgery, swallowing disturbances (lump in the throat sensation, firm neck
skin, sensation of tightness of the chest skin) may occur that are generally transient and gradually disappear.
Such disturbances are related to deep tissue scarring, with limited mobility of neck muscles.
After surgery, voice changes may occur (non associated with laryngeal nerve dysfunction); the voice may
remain clear, or weaken (early fatigability, difficulties in speaking loudly, yelling or singing). Most of these
disturbances resolve completely within a few months. Specifically, changes in voice pitch are due to
removal of compression by an enlarged thyroid (goiter) on the phonatory organ (larynx), and to
postoperative scarring and adhesions that alter the laryngeal dynamics.
After surgery, patients are allowed to move their neck normally, and the surgical wound only needs to be
covered for few days. The recovery period is usually short, even after total thyroidectomy, and patients are
free to engage in all work, family and social activities without limitations. Women of childbearing potential
can get pregnant and breastfeed. The only recommendation is to regularly take lifelong hormone
replacement therapy.
Hypocalcemia – whose symptoms should be explained by physicians at the time of discharge -may develop
in the early postoperative period or after discharge. In this case, it is recommended to take the prescribed
daily dose of calcium and/or vitamin D, and to monitor serum calcium levels weekly. Generally, calcium
levels normalize within few weeks.
If tingling of limbs persists despite treatment, immediate medical attention should be sought. In the case of
permanent hypocalcemia, the prescribed daily dose of calcium and vitamin D should be taken lifelong, with
careful evaluation of pregnant women by a gynecologist and an endocrinologist.
For further information or need please call the number ……….
26
Outpatient care and follow-up
The following take place at the Endocrine Surgery outpatient service:

Initial visits of patients referred by their primary care physician, endocrinologist or the Anatomic Pathology
Service. Patients considered for admission should be promptly provided with adequate information on:

indications for surgery;

possible alternative treatments;

advantages that surgery may offer and possible risks associated with the surgical procedure to be performed;

detailed description of transient and permanent postoperative complications.
The patient is provided with a short clinical report that includes:

medical history, with particular reference to health conditions that may require special consideration;

physical examination;

diagnosis;

proposed treatment;

diagnostic testing/investigations ordered, if any;

agreement or disagreement with other consultants’ reports provided by the patient;

if surgery is proposed, the information provided to the patient should be clearly noted on the report, in order to
obtain a preliminary consent to the recommended treatment;


application for hospital admission, including priority for admission.
Follow-up visits, if surgical dressings are needed. Otherwise, the patient will be referred to the outpatient
Endocrinology clinic for follow up.

ENT consultation for follow-up, with fiberoptic laryngoscopy to assess vocal cords mobility in case of symptoms
(dysphonia), and speech therapy, if needed, based on recommendations by the ENT surgeon and/or the phoniatrist.
Support of the endocrinologist, nuclear medicine physician, pathologist, and radiologist should be ensured at all stages
of the diagnostic-therapeutic pathway, particularly to patients with thyroid carcinoma, and the most appropriate
management of challenging cases should be determined collegially.
For patients with differentiated carcinoma, indication for postoperative radioiodine therapy should be based on risk
factors for recurrence. In particular, radioiodine therapy is indicated in high- or intermediate-risk patients or in the
presence of distant metastases, macroscopic extrathyroidal invasion, vascular invasion, cancer size > 4 cm, aggressive
histology (tall cell, columnar variant, insular variant), lymph node metastases [7].
For cancers with a diameter <1 cm, even if multifocal, and confined to the thyroid, radioiodine therapy is not generally
27
recommended, these cases being classified as at low risk of recurrence [7].
Risk stratification is essential not only to determine the most appropriate postoperative radioiodine therapy regimen, but
also to establish appropriate thyrosuppressive therapy and determine the intensity and frequency of follow-up.
Depending on the clinical course of disease and response to therapy, the risk of recurrence and mortality may vary over
time Reclassification of risk based on the information obtained during follow-up may be useful, and it is essential to
ensure proper management [7,112].
Availability of a database that can be searched and updated at any time by any member of the multidisciplinary team
and contains information essential to build and implement an individualized plan for each patient (risk stratification,
adjuvant treatment, follow-up) is desirable [113].
28
References
1. Curtis RE, Rowlings PA, Deeg HJ, et al: Solid cancers after bone marrow transplantation. N Engl J Med
336:897-904 (1997)
2. Pacini F, Vorontsova T, Demidchik EP, et al: Post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinoma in Belarus children and
adolescents: comparison with naturally occurring thyroid carcinoma in Italy and France. J Clin Endocrinol
Metab 82:3563-3569 (1997)
3. Rosato L, De Toma G, Bellantone R, et al: [Diagnostic, therapeutic and healthcare management protocols in
thyroid surgery: 3rd consensus conference of the Italian association of endocrine surgery units (U.E.C.
CLUB)]. Minerva Chir 67:365-379 (2012)
4. Elisei R, Bottici V, Luchetti F, et al: Impact of routine measurement of serum calcitonin on the diagnosis and
outcome of medullary thyroid cancer: experience in 10,864 patients with nodular thyroid disorders. J Clin
Endocrinol Metab 89:163-168 (2004)
5. Dralle H, Musholt TJ, Schabram J, et al: German Association of Endocrine Surgeons practice guideline for the
surgical management of malignant thyroid tumors. Langenbecks Arch Surg 398:347-375 (2013)
6. Gharib H, Papini E, Paschke R, et al: American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici
Endocrinologi, and EuropeanThyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis
and Management of Thyroid Nodules. Endocr Pract 16 Suppl 1:1-43 (2010)
7. American Thyroid Association Guidelines Taskforce on Thyroid N, Differentiated Thyroid C, Cooper DS, et
al: Revised American Thyroid Association management guidelines for patients with thyroid nodules and
differentiated thyroid cancer. Thyroid 19:1167-1214 (2009)
8. Cheung K, Roman SA, Wang TS, et al: Calcitonin measurement in the evaluation of thyroid nodules in the
United States: a cost-effectiveness and decision analysis. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 93:2173-2180 (2008)
9. Blum M: Ultrasonography of the Thyroid. In: De Groot LJ, Beck-Peccoz P, Chrousos G, Dungan K, Grossman
A, Hershman JM, Koch C, McLachlan R, New M, Rebar R, Singer F, Vinik A, Weickert MO, editors.
Endotext [Internet]. South Dartmouth (MA): MDText.com, Inc. (2000-2012).
10. Papini E, Guglielmi R, Bianchini A, et al: Risk of malignancy in nonpalpable thyroid nodules: predictive value
of ultrasound and color-Doppler features. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 87:1941-1946 (2002)
29
11. Yeh MW, Bauer AJ, Bernet VA, et al: American Thyroid Association statement on preoperative imaging for
thyroid cancer surgery. Thyroid 25:3-14 (2015)
12. Yu D, Han Y, Chen T: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid
lesions: meta-analysis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 151:909-915 (2014)
13. Intenzo C, Jabbour S, Miller JL, et al: Subclinical hyperthyroidism: current concepts and scintigraphic
imaging. Clin Nucl Med 36:e107-113 (2011)
14. Kahaly GJ, Bartalena L, Hegedus L: The American Thyroid Association/American Association of Clinical
Endocrinologists guidelines for hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis: a European perspective.
Thyroid 21:585-591 (2011)
15. Bellantone R, Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, et al: Management of cystic or predominantly cystic thyroid nodules:
the role of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Thyroid 14:43-47 (2004)
16. Nardi F, Basolo F, Crescenzi A, et al: Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of thyroid cytology.
J Endocrinol Invest 37:593-599 (2014)
17. De Crea C, Raffaelli M, Maccora D, et al: Calcitonin measurement in fine-needle aspirate washouts vs.
cytologic examination for diagnosis of primary or metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. Acta
Otorhinolaryngol Ital 34:399-405 (2014)
18. Giovanella L, Bongiovanni M, Trimboli P: Diagnostic value of thyroglobulin assay in cervical lymph node
fine-needle aspirations for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer. Curr Opin Oncol 25:6-13 (2013)
19. Chen BT, Jain AB, Dagis A, et al: Comparison of the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided core needle
biopsy versus fine-needle aspiration for evaluating thyroid nodules. Endocr Pract 21:128-135 (2015)
20. Kahara T, Ichikawa T, Taniguchi H, et al: Mediastinal thyroid goiter with no accumulation on scintigraphy.
Intern Med 52:2159 (2013)
21. Moschetta M, Ianora AA, Testini M, et al: Multidetector computed tomography in the preoperative evaluation
of retrosternal goiters: a useful procedure for patients for whom magnetic resonance imaging is
contraindicated. Thyroid 20:181-187 (2010)
22. Lauri C, Di Traglia S, Galli F, et al: Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer with second
generation radiopharmaceuticals. Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 59:105-115 (2015)
30
23. Agrawal K, Weaver J, Ngu R, et al: Clinical significance of patterns of incidental thyroid uptake at (18)F-FDG
PET/CT. Clin Radiol 70:536-543 (2015)
24. Deandreis D, Al Ghuzlan A, Auperin A, et al: Is (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT useful for the presurgical
characterization of thyroid nodules with indeterminate fine needle aspiration cytology? Thyroid 22:165-172
(2012)
25. Dudea SM, Botar-Jid C: Ultrasound elastography in thyroid disease. Med Ultrason 17:74-96 (2015)
26. Dalton N, Viale J, Gueugniaud P, et al: Administration périopératoire de bêtabloquants: enquête de pratique. .
Annales françaises d’Anesthésie et de Réanimation 23:1057-1062 (2004)
27. Gentile I, Rosato L, Avenia N, et al: Do Italian surgeons use antibiotic prophylaxis in thyroid surgery? Results
from a national study (UEC--Italian Endocrine Surgery Units Association). Ann Ital Chir 85:33-37 (2014)
28. Gould MK, Garcia DA, Wren SM, et al: Prevention of VTE in nonorthopedic surgical patients: Antithrombotic
Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based
Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest 141:e227S-e277S (2012)
29. Delfrate R, Lampugnani R, Rosato L: Complicanze da posizione sul letto operatorio e lesioni del plesso
brachiale. In Rosato L. Trattato Italiano di Endocrinochirurgia. Ed. CLUB delle U.E.C. – Grafica Santhiatese,
Vol. I: 403-404 (2008)
30. Federazione Nazionale degli Ordini dei Medici Chirurghi e degli Odontoiatri: Codice di Deontologia Medica
2014 - capo IV° Informazione e Comunicazione Consenso e Dissenso, artt. 33-39 (2014)
31. Carneiro-Pla D, Amin S: Comparison between preconsultation ultrasonography and office surgeon-performed
ultrasound in patients with thyroid cancer. World J Surg 38:622-627 (2014)
32. Oltmann SC, Schneider DF, Chen H, et al: All thyroid ultrasound evaluations are not equal: sonographers
specialized in thyroid cancer correctly label clinical N0 disease in well differentiated thyroid cancer. Ann Surg
Oncol 22:422-428 (2015)
33. Stalberg P, Svensson A, Hessman O, et al: Surgical treatment of Graves' disease: evidence-based approach.
World J Surg 32:1269-1277 (2008)
34. Rosato L, Pacini F, Panier Suffat L, et al: Post-thyroidectomy chronic asthenia: self-deception or disease?
Endocrine 48:615-620 (2015)
31
35. Kebebew E, Clark OH: Differentiated thyroid cancer: "complete" rational approach. World J Surg 24:942-951
(2000)
36. Agarwal G, Aggarwal V: Is total thyroidectomy the surgical procedure of choice for benign multinodular
goiter? An evidence-based review. World J Surg 32:1313-1324 (2008)
37. Moalem J, Suh I, Duh QY: Treatment and prevention of recurrence of multinodular goiter: an evidence-based
review of the literature. World J Surg 32:1301-1312 (2008)
38. Tezelman S, Borucu I, Senyurek Giles Y, et al: The change in surgical practice from subtotal to near-total or
total thyroidectomy in the treatment of patients with benign multinodular goiter. World J Surg 33:400-405
(2009)
39. Bellantone R, Boscherini M, Lombardi CP, et al: Is the identification of the external branch of the superior
laryngeal nerve mandatory in thyroid operation? Results of a prospective randomized study. Surgery
130:1055-1059 (2001)
40. Gagner M: Endoscopic subtotal parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Br J Surg
83:875 (1996)
41. Linos D: Minimally invasive thyroidectomy: a comprehensive appraisal of existing techniques. Surgery
150:17-24 (2011)
42. Perigli G, Cortesini C, Qirici E, et al: Clinical benefits of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery.
World J Surg 32:45-50 (2008)
43. Slotema ET, Sebag F, Henry JF: What is the evidence for endoscopic thyroidectomy in the management of
benign thyroid disease? World J Surg 32:1325-32 (2008)
44. Bellantone R, Lombardi C, Raffaelli M: Tiroidectomia video-assistita. In: Enciclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale Tecniche Chirurgiche – Chirurgia Generale, I–46–460-A, pp 1-14. Elsevier SAS, Paris, France (2004)
45. Miccoli P, Berti P, Raffaelli M, et al: Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy. Am J Surg 181:567570 (2001)
46. Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, D'Alatri L, et al: Video-assisted thyroidectomy significantly reduces the risk of
early postthyroidectomy voice and swallowing symptoms. World J Surg 32:693-700 (2008)
32
47. Miccoli P, Minuto MN, Ugolini C, et al: Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy for benign thyroid
disease: an evidence-based review. World J Surg 32:1333-1340 (2008)
48. Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, de Crea C, et al: Report on 8 years of experience with video-assisted thyroidectomy
for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Surgery 142:944-951; discussion 944-951 (2007)
49. Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, De Crea C, et al: Video-assisted versus conventional total thyroidectomy and
central compartment neck dissection for papillary thyroid carcinoma. World J Surg 36:1225-1230 (2012)
50. Miccoli P, Pinchera A, Materazzi G, et al: Surgical treatment of low- and intermediate-risk papillary thyroid
cancer with minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 94:1618-1622 (2009)
51. Del Rio P, Arcuri MF, Cataldo S, et al: Are we changing our inclusion criteria for the minimally invasive
videoassisted thyroidectomy? Ann Ital Chir 85:28-32 (2014)
52. Lee J, Kang SW, Jung JJ, et al: Multicenter study of robotic thyroidectomy: short-term postoperative outcomes
and surgeon ergonomic considerations. Ann Surg Oncol 18:2538-2547 (2011)
53. Richmon JD, Pattani KM, Benhidjeb T, et al: Transoral robotic-assisted thyroidectomy: a preclinical feasibility
study in 2 cadavers. Head Neck 33:330-333 (2011)
54. Terris DJ, Singer MC, Seybt MW: Robotic facelift thyroidectomy: patient selection and technical
considerations. Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 21:237-242 (2011)
55. Lee KE, Koo do H, Im HJ, et al: Surgical completeness of bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic
thyroidectomy: comparison with conventional open thyroidectomy after propensity score matching. Surgery
150:1266-1274 (2011)
56. Berber E, Siperstein A: Robotic transaxillary total thyroidectomy using a unilateral approach. Surg Laparosc
Endosc Percutan Tech 21:207-210 (2011)
57. Kang SW, Jeong JJ, Yun JS, et al: Robot-assisted endoscopic surgery for thyroid cancer: experience with the
first 100 patients. Surg Endosc 23:2399-2406 (2009)
58. Kang SW, Lee SC, Lee SH, et al: Robotic thyroid surgery using a gasless, transaxillary approach and the da
Vinci S system: the operative outcomes of 338 consecutive patients. Surgery 146:1048-1055 (2009)
59. Piccoli M, Mullineris B, Gozzo Dea: Trans-axillary thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy. In: Spinoglio G.
Robotic Surgery – Current application and new trends. pp. 15- 22 Springer-Verlag, Italy (2015)
33
60. Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, De Crea C, et al: [Complications in thyroid surgery]. Minerva Chir 62:395-408
(2007)
61. Rosato L, Avenia N, Bernante P, et al: Complications of thyroid surgery: analysis of a multicentric study on
14,934 patients operated on in Italy over 5 years. World J Surg 28:271-276 (2004)
62. Rosato L, Carlevato MT, De Toma G, et al: Recurrent laryngeal nerve damage and phonetic modifications
after total thyroidectomy: surgical malpractice only or predictable sequence? World J Surg 29:780-784 (2005)
63. Bergenfelz A, Jansson S, Kristoffersson A, et al: Complications to thyroid surgery: results as reported in a
database from a multicenter audit comprising 3,660 patients. Langenbecks Arch Surg 393:667-673 (2008)
64. Woodson G: Pathophysiology of recurrent laryngeal nerve. In: Randolph GW, Ed. Surgery of the thyroid and
parathyroid glands. pp 366-373. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Saunders. (2003)
65. Dionigi G, Lombardi D, Lombardi CP, et al: Intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery: a point
prevalence survey on utilization, management, and documentation in Italy. Updates Surg 66:269-276 (2014)
66. Randolph GW, Dralle H, International Intraoperative Monitoring Study G, et al: Electrophysiologic recurrent
laryngeal nerve monitoring during thyroid and parathyroid surgery: international standards guideline
statement. Laryngoscope 121 Suppl 1:S1-S16 (2011)
67. Barczynski M, Konturek A, Cichon S: Randomized clinical trial of visualization versus neuromonitoring of
recurrent laryngeal nerves during thyroidectomy. Br J Surg 96:240-246 (2009)
68. Hermann M, Hellebart C, Freissmuth M: Neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery: prospective evaluation of
intraoperative electrophysiological responses for the prediction of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Ann Surg
240:9-17 (2004)
69. Sitges-Serra A, Fontane J, Duenas JP, et al: Prospective study on loss of signal on the first side during
neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in total thyroidectomy. Br J Surg 100:662-6 (2013)
70. Chan WF, Lang BH, Lo CY: The role of intraoperative neuromonitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve during
thyroidectomy: a comparative study on 1000 nerves at risk. Surgery 140:866-72; discussion 872-873 (2006)
71. Yarbrough DE, Thompson GB, Kasperbauer JL, et al: Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring of the
recurrent laryngeal nerve in reoperative thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Surgery 136:1107-1115 (2004)
34
72. Phelan E, Schneider R, Lorenz K, et al: Continuous vagal IONM prevents recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis
by revealing initial EMG changes of impending neuropraxic injury: a prospective, multicenter study.
Laryngoscope 124:1498-1505 (2014)
73. Bahn Chair RS, Burch HB, Cooper DS, et al: Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis:
management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of Clinical
Endocrinologists. Thyroid 21:593-646 (2011)
74. Delbridge L: Solitary thyroid nodule: current management. ANZ J Surg 76:381-386 (2006)
75. Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Ronti S, et al: Substernal goiters: incidence, surgical approach, and complications in a
tertiary care referral center. Head Neck 33:1420-1425 (2011)
76. Testini M, Gurrado A, Avenia N, et al: Does mediastinal extension of the goiter increase morbidity of total
thyroidectomy? A multicenter study of 19,662 patients. Ann Surg Oncol 18:2251-2259 (2011)
77. White ML, Doherty GM, Gauger PG: Evidence-based surgical management of substernal goiter. World J Surg
32:1285-1300 (2008)
78. McLeod DS, Sawka AM, Cooper DS: Controversies in primary treatment of low-risk papillary thyroid cancer.
Lancet 381:1046-1057 (2013)
79. Sippel RS, Chen H: Controversies in the surgical management of newly diagnosed and recurrent/residual
thyroid cancer. Thyroid 19:1373-1380 (2009)
80. Wells SA, Jr., Asa SL, Dralle H, et al: Revised american thyroid association guidelines for the management of
medullary thyroid carcinoma. Thyroid 25:567-610 (2015)
81. Smallridge RC, Ain KB, Asa SL, et al: American Thyroid Association guidelines for management of patients
with anaplastic thyroid cancer. Thyroid 22:1104-1139 (2012)
82. Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L, et al: Prospective evaluation of total thyroidectomy versus ipsilateral versus
bilateral central neck dissection in patients with clinically node-negative papillary thyroid carcinoma. Surgery
152:957-964 (2012)
83. Sancho JJ, Lennard TW, Paunovic I, et al: Prophylactic central neck disection in papillary thyroid cancer: a
consensus report of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons (ESES). Langenbecks Arch Surg 399:155163 (2014)
35
84. White ML, Gauger PG, Doherty GM: Central lymph node dissection in differentiated thyroid cancer. World J
Surg 31:895-904 (2007)
85. Lombardi CP, Bellantone R, De Crea C, et al: Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma: extrathyroidal extension,
lymph node metastases, and risk factors for recurrence in a high prevalence of goiter area. World J Surg
34:1214-1221 (2010)
86. Giordano D, Valcavi R, Thompson GB, et al: Complications of central neck dissection in patients with
papillary thyroid carcinoma: results of a study on 1087 patients and review of the literature. Thyroid 22:911917 (2012)
87. Moo TA, Umunna B, Kato M, et al: Ipsilateral versus bilateral central neck lymph node dissection in papillary
thyroid carcinoma. Ann Surg 250:403-408 (2009)
88. Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L, et al: Ipsilateral Central Neck Dissection Plus Frozen Section Examination
Versus Prophylactic Bilateral Central Neck Dissection in cN0 Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma. Ann Surg Oncol
22:2302-2308 (2015)
89. Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L, et al: Can intraoperative frozen section influence the extension of central
neck dissection in cN0 papillary thyroid carcinoma? Langenbecks Arch Surg 398:383-388 (2013)
90. Cohen MS, Moley JF: Surgical treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma. J Intern Med 253:616-626 (2003)
91. Dralle H, Machens A: Surgical approaches in thyroid cancer and lymph-node metastases. Best Pract Res Clin
Endocrinol Metab 22:971-987 (2008)
92. Dralle H, Machens A: Surgical management of the lateral neck compartment for metastatic thyroid cancer.
Curr Opin Oncol 25:20-26 (2013)
93. Gimm O: Extent of surgery in clinically evident but operable MTC - when is central and/or lateral
lympadenectomy indicated? Thyroid Res 6 Suppl 1:S3 (2013)
94. Woods RS, Woods JF, Duignan ES, et al: Systematic review and meta-analysis of wound drains after thyroid
surgery. Br J Surg 101:446-456 (2014)
95. Udelsman R, Westra WH, Donovan PI, et al: Randomized prospective evaluation of frozen-section analysis for
follicular neoplasms of the thyroid. Ann Surg 233:716-722 (2001)
36
96. Harding J, Sebag F, Sierra M, et al: Thyroid surgery: postoperative hematoma--prevention and treatment.
Langenbecks Arch Surg 391:169-173 (2006)
97. Reeve T, Thompson NW: Complications of thyroid surgery: how to avoid them, how to manage them, and
observations on their possible effect on the whole patient. World J Surg 24:971-975 (2000)
98. Testini M, Rosato L, Avenia N, et al: The impact of single parathyroid gland autotransplantation during thyroid
surgery on postoperative hypoparathyroidism: a multicenter study. Transplant Proc 39:225-230 (2007)
99. Kurukahvecioglu O, Karamercan A, Akin M, et al: Potential benefit of oral calcium/vitamin D administration
for prevention of symptomatic hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. Endocr Regul 41:35-39 (2007)
100. Tartaglia F, Giuliani A, Sgueglia M, et al: Randomized study on oral administration of calcitriol to prevent
symptomatic hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. Am J Surg 190:424-429 (2005)
101. De Pasquale L, Sartori PV, Vicentini L, et al: Necessity of therapy for post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia: a
multi-centre experience. Langenbecks Arch Surg 400:319-324 (2015)
102. Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Carrozza C, et al: Combining early postoperative parathyroid hormone and serum
calcium levels allows for an efficacious selective post-thyroidectomy supplementation treatment. World J Surg
36:1307-1313 (2012)
103. Puzziello A, Rosato L, Innaro N, et al: Hypocalcemia following thyroid surgery: incidence and risk factors. A
longitudinal multicenter study comprising 2,631 patients. Endocrine 47:537-542 (2014)
104. Hong JW, Roh TS, Yoo HS, et al: Outcome with immediate direct anastomosis of recurrent laryngeal nerves
injured during thyroidectomy. Laryngoscope 124:1402-1408 (2014)
105. Doran HE, England J, Palazzo F, et al: Questionable safety of thyroid surgery with same day discharge. Ann R
Coll Surg Engl 94:543-547 (2012)
106. Fama F, Linard C, Patti R, et al: Short-stay hospitalisation for benign thyroid surgery: a prospective study. Eur
Arch Otorhinolaryngol 270:301-304 (2013)
107. Materazzi G, Dionigi G, Berti P, et al: One-day thyroid surgery: retrospective analysis of safety and patient
satisfaction on a consecutive series of 1,571 cases over a three-year period. Eur Surg Res 39:182-188 (2007)
108. Sorensen KR, Klug TE: Routine outpatient thyroid surgery cannot be recommended. Dan Med J 61 (2015)
37
109. Docimo G, Tolone S, Pasquali D, et al: Role of pre and post-operative oral calcium and vitamin D
supplements in prevention of hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. G Chir 33:374-378 (2012)
110. Wang TS, Cheung K, Roman SA, et al: To supplement or not to supplement: a cost-utility analysis of calcium
and vitamin D repletion in patients after thyroidectomy. Ann Surg Oncol 18:1293-1299 (2011)
111. Delbridge L: "Selective rather than routine": using sound clinical judgment. Arch Surg 147:344 (2012)
112. Rosario PW, Mourao GF, Siman TL, et al: A low postoperative nonstimulated serum thyroglobulin level
excludes the presence of persistent disease in low-risk papillary thyroid cancer patients: implication for
radioiodine indication. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) (2014). doi: 10.1111/cen.12668
113. Carty SE, Doherty GM, Inabnet WB, 3rd, et al: American Thyroid Association statement on the essential
elements of interdisciplinary communication of perioperative information for patients undergoing thyroid
cancer surgery. Thyroid 22:395-9 (2012)
38
Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare Management Protocol in Thyroid
Surgery: 4th Consensus Conference of the Italian Association of Endocrine
Surgery Units (U.E.C. CLUB)
Abstract
Background
Il Protocollo Gestionale Diagnostico-Terapeutico-Assistenziale dell’Associazione delle Unità di
Endocrinochirurgia Italiane (CLUB delle UEC) ha l’obiettivo di aiutare a curare il paziente in modo
adeguato, razionale e clinicamente condivisibile.
Methods
Questa 4th Consensus Conference è stata realizzata: nella fase istruttoria, da un gruppo selezionato
di esperti; nella fase elaborativa, via e-mail fra tutti i Soci; nella fase conclusiva, fra tutti i
partecipanti all’XI Congresso Nazionale del CLUB delle U.E.C. di Napoli. Sono stati esaminati:
percorso diagnostico e inquadramento clinico; modalità e tempi di ricovero; percorso terapeutico
(preparazione del paziente all’intervento, trattamento chirurgico, gestione post-operatoria, gestione
delle complicanze maggiori); dimissione e documentazione informativa; ambulatorio e follow-up.
Results
Nella presentazione del testo si è mantenuta una forma discorsiva, ancorché sintetica, per esporre
anche la motivazione e le ragioni scientifiche che stanno dietro ai comportamenti e fornire agli
operatori una guida il più possibile completa su chi, quando, come e perché fare. Il Protocollo vuole
essere di ausilio al chirurgo nel curare il paziente in modo attuale, razionale e clinicamente
condivisibile; senza, però, condizionare in alcun modo il rapporto medico-paziente che si basa sulla
fiducia e sul giudizio clinico espresso su ogni singolo caso.
Conclusions
Il Protocollo Diagnostico, Terapeutico e Assistenziale in chirurgia tiroidea approvato dalla 4°
Consensus Conference (Giugno 2015) è il PDTA ufficiale dell’Associazione delle Ubità di
Endocrinochirurgia Italiane (Club delle U.E.C.)
39
Premessa
La Consensus Conference ha aggiornato il Protocollo Gestionale Diagnostico-TerapeuticoAssistenziale in Chirurgia Tiroidea dell’Associazione delle Unità di Endocrinochirurgia Italiane
(CLUB delle U.E.C.), giunto alla sua 4a edizione.
I Soci dell’Associazione delle Unità di Endocrinochirurgia Italiane (CLUB delle U.E.C.) hanno
costituito il gruppo di esperti, confrontando la loro esperienza con la revisione della più recente
letteratura scientifica. La Consensus Conference è stata realizzata, nella fase istruttoria, da un
gruppo selezionato di esperti; nella fase elaborativa, via e-mail fra tutti i Soci e, nella fase
conclusiva, fra tutti i partecipanti all’XI Congresso Nazionale del CLUB delle U.E.C. di Napoli
(June 2015).
L’obiettivo è che i Protocolli siano di ausilio al chirurgo nel curare il paziente in modo attuale,
razionale e clinicamente condivisibile, tenuto conto sia degli importanti aspetti clinici, assistenziali
e terapeutici, sia delle possibili sequele e complicanze. Si è mantenuta una presentazione discorsiva,
ancorché sintetica, per esporre anche la motivazione e le ragioni scientifiche che stanno dietro ai
comportamenti e fornire, così, agli operatori una guida il più possibile completa sul chi, quando,
come e perché fare. Non è, comunque, negli scopi degli Autori e del CLUB delle UEC di
condizionare in alcun modo il rapporto medico-paziente che si basa sulla fiducia e sul giudizio
clinico espresso su ogni singolo caso. Sono stati esaminati:

Percorso diagnostico e valutazione clinica;

Modalità e tempi di ammissione;

Perscorso terapeutico:
-
preparazione del paziente all’intervento,
-
trattamento chirurgico,
-
gestione post-operatoria,
-
prevenzione e gestione delle complicanze maggiori;

Dimissione ospedaliera e documentazione informativa al paziente;

Ambulatorio e follow-up.
40
Percorso diagnostico e valutazione clinica
Il corretto iter diagnostico della patologia tiroidea di pertinenza chirurgica prevede, in prima
istanza, un’accurata valutazione clinica (anamnesi ed esame obiettivo) che, a seconda dell’ipotesi
diagnostica, guiderà nella scelta successiva delle indagini laboratoristiche e diagnostiche più
appropriate.
Gli elementi anamnestici più rilevanti comprendono: irradiazione cervicale o “total body” per
trapianto di midollo (1) o di esposizione a radiazioni ionizzanti durante l’infanzia o l’adolescenza
(2), parenti di I grado affetti da sindromi che includano il carcinoma della tiroide (sindrome di
Cowden, poliposi familiare, complesso di Carney, MEN 2, sindrome di Werner, ecc.), noduli
tiroidei in rapida crescita, reperto clinico di disfonia. L’esame obiettivo dovrà prevedere una
valutazione accurata della tiroide e delle stazioni linfonodali latero-cervicali.
La diagnostica deve essere essenziale e mirata non solo alla definizione nosografica dell’affezione
tiroidea (diagnostica di laboratorio), ma anche alla definizione dell’indicazione terapeutica e
dell’estensione dell’eventuale intervento chirurgico (diagnostica strumentale).
Il corretto iter diagnostico per le patologie tiroidee prevede esami di I livello, necessari per una
prima valutazione, ed esami di II livello, finalizzati all’approfondimento diagnostico e
all’indicazione terapeutica.
DIAGNOSTICA DI LABORATORIO

Esami di I livello
 TSH reflex o screening. In caso di TSH alterato, il laboratorio di analisi eseguirà anche il
dosaggio di fT3 e fT4 (3).

Esami di II livello
 Calcitonina. Il dosaggio routinario della calcitonina nei pazienti affetti da noduli tiroidei, ha
il vantaggio di favorire la diagnosi precoce del carcinoma midollare della tiroide e, di
conseguenza, di associarsi a migliorata sopravvivenza a 10 anni dei pazienti affetti da questa
neoplasia (4). Anche in considerazione di questi risultati, in alcune Consensus Europee si
raccomanda l’impiego routinario della calcitonina come screening per il carcinoma
midollare della tiroide (5-6). Il dosaggio routinario della calcitonina nei pazienti affetti da
patologia nodulare tiroidea rimane, invece, controverso negli Stati Uniti in considerazione
dei falsi-positivi e del conseguente basso valore predittivo positivo (7-8). Tuttavia, in
considerazione del fatto che una diagnosi precoce del carcinoma midollare della tiroide ne
potrebbe migliorare la sopravvivenza e che la citologia su agoaspirato non esclude in
41
maniera affidabile la diagnosi di carcinoma midollare della tiroide (4, 6), è consigliabile il
dosaggio routinario della calcitonina prima della tiroidectomia. In presenza di alterati valori
della calcitonina basale è opportuno eseguire un test di stimolazione della calcitonina con
calcio gluconato per la diagnosi differenziale tra iperplasia delle cellule C e carcinoma
midollare della tiroide (6).
Livelli di calcitonina stimolata ≤100 pg/ml non escludono la
diagnosi di carcinoma midollare della tiroide mentre, in presenza di una calcitonina
stimolata >100 pg/ml, la probabilità di un carcinoma midollare della tiroide è elevata. Nel
caso di livelli di calcitonina stimolata >500 pg/ml la diagnosi di carcinoma midollare della
tiroide è quasi certa (6).
 Calcemia.
Il
dosaggio preoperatorio della calcemia è utile per lo
screening
dell’iperparatiroidismo I;
 Fosforemia e dosaggio del Paratormone (PTH): in caso di ipercalcemia;
 Anti-TPO (anticorpi anti perossidasi tiroidea), anti-HTG (anticorpi anti tireoglobulina): nel
sospetto di patologia autoimmune;
 TSH-Receptor Antibody (TRab): in suspected Graves' disease.
DIAGNOSTICA STRUMENTALE

Esami di I livello
 Ecografia tiroidea, con valutazione color-doppler della tiroide (5, 7, 9-11):
Deve essere eseguita in tutti i pazienti con sospetto clinico di nodulo tiroideo e/o gozzo
nodulare e nei casi di riscontro radiologico incidentale di patologia nodulare della tiroide
(TAC o RMN del collo, captazioni a livello della tiroide in corso di 18FDG-PET, ecc.) (57). L’ecografia consente un’accurata valutazione morfologica della tiroide e delle relative
stazioni linfonodali loco-regionali e l’acquisizione di dati inerenti:
o sede, dimensioni (eventuale volume ghiandolare totale), struttura dei lobi;
o presenza, numero, dimensioni e struttura (solida, cistica, mista) dei noduli tiroidei;
o pattern color-doppler della vascolarizzazione nodulare (10);
o stato del lobo controlaterale, in caso di patologia monolaterale;
o descrizione di caratteristiche dei noduli indicative di malignità (ipoecogenicità,
microcalcificazioni,
assenza
di
alone
periferico,
vascolarizzazione endonodulare; forma tondeggiante)
o condizione della trachea (in asse, deviata, compressa);
o stato dei linfonodi locoregionali (reattivi o sospetti).
42
margini
irregolari,
vivace

Esami di II livello
Sono finalizzati all’approfondimento diagnostico e all’indicazione terapeutica e servono a
programmare la strategia chirurgica, soprattutto in caso di approcci mininvasivi e nei
reinterventi:

Contrast Enhanched Ultrasound (CEUS). L'ecografia con mezzo di contrasto rappresenta
una promettente tecnica non invasiva per la diagnosi differenziale di natura dei noduli
tiroidei. Essa è caratterizzata da un range abbastanza variabile di sensibilità (68-100%) e
specificità (67-94%) (12), probabilmente perché la valutazione è operatore-dipendente.

Scintigrafia tiroidea, con eventuale curva di iodocaptazione. Le indicazioni per questa
metodica non hanno subito recenti modifiche. Le indicazioni rimangono limitate a (13-14):
 ipertiroidismo clinico o sub-clinico,
 gozzo recidivo,
 sospetto di gozzi “dimenticati” o ectopici.

Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC). Tecnica accurata ed efficace per la valutazione
dei noduli tiroidei e nella diagnosi di natura. La guida ecografica riduce significativamente
il numero di risultati non diagnostici e di falsi negativi (7), soprattutto nel caso di noduli con
un’elevata probabilità di prelievo non diagnostico (componente cistica >25-50%) (15) e/o di
noduli palpabili con difficoltà o localizzati posteriormente. L’agoaspirato è indicato in tutti i
noduli ecograficamente o clinicamente sospetti con diametro >1 cm. Non è raccomandato
come procedura routinaria nel caso di noduli subcentimetrici; tuttavia, nel caso di noduli
<1cm, è consigliabile nelle seguenti situazioni (7):
 età pediatrica,
 familiarità per carcinoma tiroideo,
 presenza di linfoadenopatie cervicali sospette,
 pregressa terapia radiante cranio-cervico-mediastinica,
 esposizione a radiazioni ionizzanti durante infanzia e adolescenza,
 nodulo con caratteristiche ecografiche sospette (ipoecogenità, microcalcificazioni,
spiccata vascolarizzazione),
 follow-up di un carcinoma tiroideo trattato con loboistmectomia,
 nodulo tiroideo captante alla 18FDG-PET.
Il referto citologico deve essere descrittivo, ma anche concludersi con l’attribuzione del
paziente a una categoria diagnostica ben definita e identificabile con un codice numerico. La
Consensus italiana SIAPEC 2014 presenta una classificazione citologica che si differenzia
dalla precedente per avere introdotto, oltre il Thy1 (prelievo inadeguato, da ripetere), il
43
Thy1c (noduli cistici. Prelievo non diagnostico, ma da non ripetere). La nuova
classificazione suddivide, inoltre, il Thy3 in:
o Thy3a (lesione indeterminata a basso rischio di malignità):
- scarsa colloide (presente soprattutto alla periferia dello striscio), tessuto vascolare,
istiociti pigmentari;
- lembi anche microfollicolari di tireociti di media taglia (<60%) senza atipie nucleari;
- strisci con aspetti regressivi cellulari.
o Thy3b (lesione indeterminata ad alto rischio di malignita):
- colloide scarsa o assente;
- aggregati microfollicolari di tireociti di media taglia (>60%);
- focale polimorfismo, ma assenza di atipie nucleari suggestive per carcinoma
papillare;
- lo stesso pattern microfollicolare o trabecolare può essere costituito da cellule ossifile
(proliferazione follicolare ossifila)
Questa ulteriore suddivisione del Thy3 è finalizzata a ridurre la percentuale di noduli con
citologia indeterminata da sottoporre all’intervento chirurgico (16). Lo studio citologico può
essere integrato dall’utilizzo di marcatori immunocitochimici e/o genetico-molecolari.
Calcitonina, Cromogranina A e CEA sono impiegati nel sospetto di carcinoma midollare,
mentre il PTH può identificare una lesione di pertinenza paratiroidea.
Il dosaggio della tireoglobulina e della calcitonina, effettuato sul liquido di lavaggio dell’ago
nel corso di agoaspirato su noduli tiroidei e/o su linfonodi del collo, rappresenta una valida
integrazione alla citologia convenzionale per la diagnosi dei tumori tiroidei primitivi o
metastatici, soprattutto nei casi dubbi o non diagnostici (17-18).

Core needle biopsy (CNB). Biopsia tissutale ottenuta mediante ago tranciante, in genere
dotato di meccanismo retrattile a molla (Tru-cut, 18-21 G). Tale metodica, effettuata solo
sotto guida ecografica, non è attualmente universalmente impiegata nella routine
diagnostica. Il prelievo di tessuto comprendente sia la periferia del nodulo sia il passaggio
con il parenchima extra-nodulare mostra le caratteristiche architetturali del tessuto tiroideo,
consentendo una diagnosi microistologica della lesione. Recentemente, le indicazioni della
CNB sono state estese ai noduli con diagnosi citologica inadeguata (Tir 1) o indeterminata
(Tir 3) (19).

Fibroscopia
laringea.
E’
raccomandabile
l’esecuzione
della
fibrolaringoscopica
preoperatoria in tutti i pazienti candidati a tiroidectomia per valutare l’integrità morfologica
e funzionale delle corde vocali. E’ necessaria:
44
 se presente disfonia,
 nei re-interventi per possibili pregresse lesioni iatrogene del nervo laringeo inferiore,
 nel gozzo voluminoso e/o immerso,
 nei carcinomi tiroidei localmente avanzati.

TC / RM. Per il completamento diagnostico anatomo-topografico (senza mezzo di contrasto
iodato, nei gozzi iperfunzionanti. I più recenti mezzi di contrasto iodati interferiscono molto
meno con la iodoterapia e sono necessari per documentare eventuali infiltrazioni di trachea e
vasi) in caso di:
 gozzo cervico-mediastinico (20-21);
 gozzo residuo;
 neoplasia sospetta invasiva, per documentare l'eventuale invasione delle strutture
adiacenti;
 recidive complesse.

124-I-PET. Studi recenti ne hanno dimostrato una superiore attendibilità diagnostica rispetto
alla “classica” scintigrafia whole-body con
131
I nelle neoplasie differenziate della tiroide e,
soprattutto, si è riscontrato un alto numero di casi con negatività scintigrafica e positività
alla PET. Sono in fase di studio nuovi radiofarmaci che potrebbero migliorarne
ulteriormente la performance (22).

18
F-FDG PET-CT. Può essere utile in caso di ipertireoglobulinemia da sospetta recidiva
locale e/o a distanza, nel caso di lesioni sospette non captanti
131
I. Questa metodica,
utilizzata per la stadiazione di molte neoplasie, può accidentalmente rivelare aree
ipercaptanti a livello tiroideo definite "incidentalomi" che, nel 25% dei casi, si rivelano
essere carcinomi. Al momento, non può essere considerato un esame di routine (23-24).

Elastosonografia. Misura il grado di distorsione di un tessuto sottoposto a una forza esterna
e, quindi, può determinare la consistenza del tessuto in esame. Le lesioni maligne sono
spesso associate a modificazioni delle proprietà meccaniche dei tessuti e, pertanto, questa
metodica può favorire la definizione diagnostica della lesione esaminata. L’applicabilità
dell’elastosonografia nella pratica clinica è, tuttavia, limitata dalla variabile sensibilità (54–
69%) e specificità (60-96%) riportata nelle diverse esperienze (25).
45
Modalità e tempi di ammissione

PRIORITA’ di RICOVERO:
 alta: entro 1 mese, per patologia neoplastica accertata e/o avanzata;
 media: entro 3 mesi per patologia neoplastica sospetta o in caso di scarsa compliance alla
terapia tireostatica;
 bassa: 12 mesi per patologia benigna eutiroidea e ipertiroidea stabilizzata.

ESAMI IN PRE-RICOVERO (o al ricovero):
 Esami ematochimici, esame emocromocitometrico e prove di coagulazione per intervento
chirurgico;
 ECG;
 Rx Torace (ove indicato, in relazione all’età e alle comorbilità del paziente);
 visita anestesiologica;
 visita ORL per valutazione della motilità delle corde vocali (preferibilmente con fibroscopia
laringea): raccomandabile in tutti i pazienti; necessario in caso di reinterventi, gozzi
intratoracici, patologia maligna della tiroide.

RACCOMANDAZIONI PER IL PAZIENTE:

Assumere fino al giorno che precede l’intervento la terapia tiroidea in atto (metimazolo,
propiltiouracile, tiroxina, betabloccanti cronicamente assunti), salvo diversa indicazione
medica o anestesiologica (26);
 la sospensione degli antiaggreganti almeno una settimana prima dell’intervento, sostituibile
con eparina a basso peso molecolare, deve correlarsi nei soggetti affetti da patologia
cardiovascolare, come per qualsiasi intervento chirurgico, con le comorbilità.

RICOVERO:
Salvo diversa indicazione o necessità, si può eseguire il giorno stesso dell’intervento.
46
Percorso terapeutico
Preparazione del paziente per la chirurgia

ANTIBIOTICI: la profilassi antibiotica non è indicata negli interventi di tiroidectomia (3, 27),
eccetto casi particolari quali: diabete grave, valvulopatie cardiache, immunodeficienza
(dializzati e/o trapiantati).

PROFILASSI ANTI-TROMBOTICA: Le linee guida internazionali (3, 28) non hanno un
capitolo specifico per la patologia tiroidea o del collo. Le indicazioni alla profilassi
antitrombotica che esse pongono per la chirurgia generale sono:
- Eparina a Basso Peso Molecolare (EBPM) negli interventi di durata >45 minuti e in pazienti
con età >40 anni;
- Uso di idonee calze elastiche o compressione pneumatica intermittente in presenza di fattori
di rischio tromboembolico.
I chirurghi endocrini non sono unanimi nell’indicazione all’utilizzo della profilassi
antitrombotica con Eparina a Basso Peso Molecolare nella chirurgia tiroidea per l’elevato
rischio che può comportare la formazione di un ematoma postchirurgico nella loggia tiroidea.

DISINFEZIONE CUTANEA: accurata pulizia della cute. Alcuni autori suggeriscono di usare disinfettanti non
iodati, evitando di inficiare un’eventuale mappa scintigrafica post-chirurgica in caso di riscontro di patologia
neoplastica.

UNITA’ DI SANGUE: non è giustificato effettuare il pre-deposito o predisporre unità di
sangue per la tiroidectomia.

POSIZIONE SUL LETTO OPERATORIO (a cura dell’anestesista di sala e del chirurgo):
 paziente supino con un modesto rialzo sotto le spalle, a livello scapolare, che consenta una
lieve iperestensione del collo;

con il collo in iperestensione, ancorché modesta, le braccia devono essere addotte e fissate
lungo il corpo per evitare rare, ma spesso gravi e talora irreversibili, paralisi da stiramento
del plesso brachiale (29);
 protezione dei gomiti con adeguata imbottitura per evitare la paralisi da compressione del
nervo ulnare;
 protezione degli occhi per evitare ulcerazioni corneali e traumi oculari.

CONSENSO INFORMATO:
E’ necessario che il chirurgo informi adeguatamente il paziente sulle indicazioni al trattamento
chirurgico, le eventuali terapie alternative, i vantaggi attesi dall’intervento, le complicanze
47
generiche e specifiche, le eventuali terapie riabilitative e sulle possibili condizioni cliniche in
caso di lesioni permanenti postoperatorie.
L’informazione fornita deve avere i requisiti della chiarezza espositiva, completezza e
tempestività. Dopo avere fornito la più completa informazione, il medico richiederà al paziente
il consenso a eseguire l’intervento, tenendo in considerazione qualsiasi espressione di dissenso
anche su singoli aspetti della procedura o sulle sue possibili conseguenze.
E’ opportuno che l’informazione e il consenso si svolgano, preliminarmente, già durante la
prima visita e rinnovate al momento del ricovero, prima dell’intervento, soprattutto se sia
intercorso un intervallo tale da avere potuto modificare le condizioni iniziali. Al paziente,
infatti, deve essere data la possibilità di approfondire, con il proprio medico (o altra persona di
sua fiducia), le informazioni ricevute e di acquisire, se lo desidera, referenze sulla struttura
sanitaria che dovrà accoglierlo o sull’équipe che dovrà operarlo.
E’ necessario che di questo consenso informato e consapevole rimanga una documentazione
scritta, vista la particolarità della prestazione terapeutica (asportazione parziale o totale della
tiroide) e le sue possibili conseguenze sull’integrità fisica del soggetto (30), e che dell’acquisito
consenso si riporti anche specifica annotazione nel diario clinico.
A questo proposito, si adotta lo schema di consenso seguente che, di volta in volta, deve essere
personalizzato e sottoscritto dal paziente e dal medico:
48
MODULO di INFORMAZIONE e CONSENSO all’ATTO MEDICO
Io sottoscritto
dichiaro di essere stato informato, sia durante la prima visita, sia al
momento del ricovero, in modo chiaro e a me comprensibile dal Dr
che per la patologia riscontratami di
è indicato
l’intervento chirurgico di cui mi sono stati chiaramente spiegati gli obiettivi, i benefici (anche in
rapporto a terapie alternative), gli eventuali rischi e/o menomazioni prevedibili.
Mi è stato spiegato, inoltre, che, se intraoperatoriamente verrà confermato il reperto ecografico e/o
scintigrafico, l'intervento previsto consisterà nell’asportazione totale o sub totale (se necessario) della
tiroide.
Sono stato informato che questo intervento può comportare:
 la lesione provvisoria o definitiva dei nervi laringei che innervano le corde vocali, con conseguenti
alterazioni anche gravi della voce (4% circa dei casi di cui il 2% temporanee, regredendo entro un
tempo massimo di un anno, ma 1-2% definitive). Si possono manifestare, altresì, nei casi di
sofferenza bilaterale dei nervi laringei (0,6%), conseguente ad asportazione totale o quasi totale
della tiroide, difficoltà respiratorie che potrebbero comportare (con una incidenza dello 0,3%) anche
la necessità, quasi sempre temporanea, di una tracheotomia. Le alterazioni fonatorie possono
manifestarsi con voce rauca, soffiata, diplofonica, di falsetto o anche con alterazioni del timbro, del
tono, dell’estensione, dell’intensità e dell’affaticabilità vocale con difficoltà anche ad intonare il
canto. A queste alterazioni della voce possono associarsi, ma quasi sempre con carattere transitorio,
anche alterazioni deglutitorie con difficoltà ad inghiottire i liquidi;
 la lesione provvisoria o definitiva delle ghiandole paratiroidi con conseguente alterazione del
quantitativo di calcio e fosforo nel sangue e, quindi, la necessità di assumere terapia a base di
calcio e vitamina D anche per tutta la vita (questa condizione si verifica in circa il 3% dei casi);
 emorragie postoperatorie che potrebbero comportare anche la necessità di un reintervento urgente a
scopo emostatico;
 infezione della ferita chirurgica;
 alterazioni e modificazioni della voce, che possono manifestarsi pur in assenza di lesioni nervose e
di paralisi delle corde vocali, legate a fenomeni cicatriziali e aderenziali post-chirurgici fra la
muscolatura del collo (pretiroidea) e la laringe;
 possibile insorgenza di astenia di lieve-modesta entità nel postoperatorio della tiroidectomia totale
(fino al 25% dei casi);
 possibile presenza di residuo ghiandolare post-operatorio o mancata asportazione di noduli ectopici,
anche in caso di tiroidectomia totale (2-4% dei casi).
Il chirurgo mi ha, altresì, sufficientemente informato sull’incidenza che hanno queste complicanze
(anche facendo riferimento alla sua casistica personale), spiegandomi come la chirurgia, e in particolare
quella della tiroide, benché eseguita con tecnica rigorosa, non può considerarsi esente da rischi in
quanto, sia i nervi laringei, sia le ghiandole paratiroidi possono andare incontro a sofferenza
temporanea e definitiva anche per una serie di cause che prescindono dal corretto trattamento chirurgico
(esposizione chirurgica dei nervi, eventi cicatriziali, sofferenze da freddo o da calore, sofferenza
vascolare e altre cause non conosciute). Sono stato informato, inoltre, che dovrò assumere per tutta la
vita una terapia a base di ormoni tiroidei, soprattutto se mi verrà asportata completamente la tiroide e
che mi rimarrà una cicatrice chirurgica del collo.
Sono, comunque, consapevole che, presentandosi la necessità di salvarmi da un pericolo imminente
e non altrimenti evitabile di un danno grave alla mia persona o se si constatassero difficoltà a eseguire
l'intervento chirurgico con la tecnica propostami, verranno poste in atto tutte le pratiche che i sanitari
curanti riterranno idonee a scongiurare o limitare tale pericolo e, comunque, a portare a termine
l'intervento chirurgico nella migliore sicurezza, ove necessario, anche modificando il programma
terapeutico prospettatomi.
49
Ciò premesso, dichiaro di essere stato invitato a leggere con molta attenzione quanto riportato in questo
scritto composto di due pagine, che corrisponde, peraltro, a quanto ampiamente spiegatomi a voce.
Dichiaro, altresì, di avere ben compreso il significato di quanto mi è stato esposto e di non avere ulteriori
chiarimenti da chiedere oltre a quelli che mi sono stati già forniti e che io ho riportato, di seguito, di mio
pugno:
......................................................................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................................................................
......................................................................................................................................................................
Consapevolmente, quindi, acconsento / non acconsento al trattamento chirurgico propostomi.
Sono consapevole che in qualsiasi momento io posso revocare questo mio consenso, informandone il
personale sanitario che mi ha in cura
Firma leggibile della paziente. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firma leggibile del medico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P.S.: Autorizzo / non autorizzo, inoltre, i sanitari curanti, ove durante l’intervento chirurgico
evidenziassero altre patologie non precedentemente diagnosticate e non rinviabili per motivi di urgenza
o perché possono costituire un pericolo imminente per la mia vita, a provvedere, secondo scienza e
coscienza, alla cura di tali patologie, anche modificando il programma terapeutico prospettatomi e
preventivamente concordato
Firma leggibile della paziente. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Firma leggibile del medico. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data e ora
50

INDICAZIONI
Le affezioni tiroidee di pertinenza chirurgica sono sostanzialmente rappresentate dai tumori maligni
e dalla patologia displastico-iperplastica focale o diffusa, dagli ipertiroidismi e, marginalmente,
dalle tiroiditi.
La patologia maligna della tiroide comprende un gruppo eterogeneo di tumori caratterizzati da una
considerevole diversità in termini di biologia e prognosi. La maggior parte dei tumori maligni
tiroidei originano dalle cellule follicolari: carcinoma papillare, follicolare, carcinoma poco
differenziato e indifferenziato (anaplastico). Altri tumori derivano dalle cellule parafollicolari o
cellule C della tiroide (carcinoma midollare) e, infine, una minoranza di tumori derivano dalle
cellule mesenchimali tiroidee (linfoma maligno, sarcoma, ecc.).
Le patologia tiroidea benigna di pertinenza chirurgica comprende tutte le condizioni caratterizzate
da alterazioni della morfologia e/o della funzione ghiandolare. In questo ambito, lo scopo delle
procedure diagnostiche è di chiarire la natura della patologia tiroidea e di definire tutte le alterazioni
morfologiche e funzionali della ghiandola, tenendo conto delle differenti opzioni terapeutiche
disponibili. L’indicazione al trattamento chirurgico deve essere posta considerando i risultati degli
esami diagnostici e di localizzazione, le eventuali alternative terapeutiche conservative e le possibili
complicanze dell’intervento chirurgico.
Il trattamento chirurgico può richiedere procedure diagnostiche specifiche per meglio pianificare
l’intervento chirurgico come l’ecografia preoperatoria, eseguita dal chirurgo, che può essere utile
nella valutazione dell’estensione dell’intervento chirurgico (31-32). Dopo l’intervento chirurgico si
deve prevedere, inoltre, un accurato follow-up per rilevare tempestivamente eventuali sequele o
complicanze.
Le principali indicazioni chirurgiche nelle tireopatie sono:
 patologia maligna sospetta o accertata;
 patologia compressiva severa (disfagia, disfonia, dispnea);
 crescita volumetrica rapida;
 gozzo cervico-mediastinico;
 deviazione/compressione tracheale e/o esofagea;
 gozzo tossico (uni- /multinodulare);
 malattia di Graves resistente alla terapia medica e/o con oftalmopatia severa (33);
 presenza di mutazione del gene RET.
51
Trattamento chirurgico
Di tutte le procedure proposte per la chirurgia tiroidea vengono ritenute attuali (3):
 Loboistmectomia (34);
 tiroidectomia totale (o near-total thyroidectomy, considerata sinonimo nell’accezione
anglosassone, in quanto la persistenza di residui, ancorché minimali, è praticamente
costante, senza inficiare la radicalità dell’intervento) (35);
 tiroidectomia sub totale con residuo monolaterale: il suo uso nella pratica clinica è limitato,
in considerazione della aumentata incidenza di recidive ghiandolari da cui è gravata e dalla
possibilità di inadeguato trattamento di carcinomi tiroidei scoperti incidentalmente. A fronte
di questi svantaggi, il beneficio in termini di complicanze postoperatorie rispetto alla
tiroidectomia totale è controverso (36-38).
La redazione dell’atto operatorio deve essere accurata e deve prevedere la descrizione della
ghiandola tiroidea e delle caratteristiche macroscopiche dei noduli più significativi. Il chirurgo
deve fare riferimento, altresì, alla eventuale identificazione e salvaguardia della branca esterna
del nervo laringeo superiore (39); alla identificazione e preservazione dei nervi laringei
inferiori, indicando eventuali difficoltà di dissezione; alle ghiandole paratiroidi, precisandone la
sede, la morfologia e il mantenimento dell’integrità anatomica e della vascolarizzazione. E’,
inoltre, opportuno motivare qualora si riscontri la necessità di lasciare residui macroscopici
tiroidei, precisandone la sede e l’entità.

Requisiti tecnici che definiscono la loboistmectomia:
 rimozione completa extra-capsulare di un lobo più l’istmo e la piramide, se presente;
 identificazione e/o preparazione del nervo laringeo ricorrente;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica e vascolare delle paratiroidi;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica della branca esterna del nervo laringeo superiore.

Requisiti tecnici che definiscono la tiroidectomia totale:
 rimozione completa extra-capsulare della tiroide più la piramide, se presente;
 identificazione e/o preparazione dei nervi laringei ricorrenti bilateralmente;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica e vascolare delle paratiroidi bilateralmente;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica della branca esterna del nervo laringeo superiore
bilateralmente.

Requisiti tecnici che definiscono la tiroidectomia sub totale con residuo monolaterale:
 rimozione completa extra-capsulare di un lobo, dell’istmo e della piramide, se presente,
lasciando un residuo del lobo controlaterale. La tecnica prevede una minima quota di
52
tessuto tiroideo residuo lasciato nell’area del ligamento di Berry al fine di evitare danni
alla paratiroide superiore e/o al nervo ricorrente nel punto in cui entra in laringe al di
sotto del muscolo costrittore inferiore della laringe (35-38).
 identificazione e/o preparazione del nervo laringeo ricorrente da un lato ed
evidenziazione controlaterale;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica e vascolare delle paratiroidi bilateralmente;
 rispetto dell’integrità anatomica della branca esterna del nervo laringeo superiore
bilateralmente.

Tecniche mininvasive
Dopo la prima paratiroidectomia subtotale endoscopica (40) descritta nel 1996, sono state
sviluppate numerose tecniche mini-invasive anche per la tiroidectomia (41). Gli approcci
mini-invasi alla tiroidectomia possono essere classificati in tecniche che prevedono o no
l’uso dell’endoscopio. Queste ultime (MIT; minimal incision thyroidectomy) si differenziano
dalla tiroidectomia convenzionale per una riduzione dell’incisione cutanea e sopperiscono ai
vantaggi della magnificazione ottica, offerta dall’endoscopio, utilizzando altri ausili ottici
(occhialini ingranditori 2,5/3,5x) (42).
Le differenti tecniche che utilizzano l’endoscopio possono essere suddivise in tecniche
endoscopiche pure e tecniche video-assistite.
Le tecniche endoscopiche hanno un loro limite importante nella difficoltà che la dissezione
puramente endoscopica comporta, soprattutto se realizzata da accessi completamente
differenti da quelli utilizzati nella chirurgia convenzionale (accessi ascellare, mammario,
toracico), che hanno limitato la loro diffusione agli autori che le hanno proposte (41, 43).
La tiroidectomia mini-invasiva video-assistita (MIVAT) è una tecnica totalmente gasless,
che si avvale di un accesso chirurgico orizzontale centrale di 1.5-2.0 cm di lunghezza, di
un’ottica da 30° 5 mm e di strumenti dedicati per la dissezione (44-45). Questa tecnica ha
incontrato il maggior numero di consensi e rappresenta una metodica sicura e riproducibile,
con complicanze sovrapponibili rispetto alla chirurgia convenzionale, rispetto alla quale
presenta vantaggi significativi in termini di diminuzione del dolore e del discomfort
postoperatori nonché in termini di risultato estetico (46-47).
Indicazioni alla MIVAT (48-50):
 noduli di diametro massimo di 35 mm;
 volume tiroideo ≤30ml;
 carcinoma papillare della tiroide a rischio-basso ed intermedio (48, 49);
53
 pazienti portatori di mutazione del gene RET.
Controindicazioni assolute:
 pregressi interventi chirurgici sul collo (sono escluse le totalizzazioni di tiroidectomia)
(45);
 carcinomi tiroidei localmente avanzati;
 metastasi linfonodali note pre-operatoriamente. Nonostante sia stato dimostrato che i
risultati della linfoadenectomia del comparto centrale (VI livello) con tecnica videoassistita siano, in casi selezionati, sovrapponibili a quelli della tecnica convenzionale per
radicalità oncologica (50), un coinvolgimento linfonodale del VI livello evidente preoperatoriamente controindica, attualmente, l’approccio video-assistito.
Controindicazioni relative:

pregressa irradiazione della regione cervicale;

presenza di tiroidite e/o malattia di Graves.
Alcuni Autori considerano controindicazioni alla tiroidectomia video-assistita alcune
caratteristiche conformazionali del paziente quali obesità e collo corto (51).

Tiroidectomia robotica
La tecnologia robotica, applicata al distretto cervico-facciale, propone diversi approcci
indiretti alla loggia tiroidea: trans-ascellare gasless, che è il più utilizzato (52), trans-orale
(53), retro auricolare (54), transareolare (55).
Indicazioni:
 patologia benigna: noduli ≤5 cm, lesioni follicolari, morbo di Graves;
 patologia maligna: tumori ben differenziati (se non si è maturata una consolidata
esperienza, opportuno riservare l’approccio robotico ai carcinomi differenziati di
piccole dimensioni, in assenza di linfoadenopatie latero-cervicali note preoperatoriamente (56-59).
Controindicazioni:
 patologia autoimmune, che rende difficoltose le manovre chirurgiche robotiche per la
presenza di aderenze perighiandolari e per la ipervascolarizzazione;
 pregressa chirurgia tiroidea o mammaria;
 precedenti trattamenti radioterapici del distretto cervico-facciale;
 presenza di dispositivi elettromedicali (pace-maker, defibrillatori) in regione pettorale.
Controindicazioni relative sono rappresentate da:
54
artrosi o pregressa chirurgia ortopedica dell’articolazione scapolo-omerale per le posizioni
che l’arto superiore viene ad assumere in questo tipo di procedura chirurgica;
BMI (Body Mass Index) >30 (57). Se, inoltre, la distanza tra l'ascella e il giugulo risulta
essere più di 15 cm, può risultare più difficoltoso la creazione del tunnel (57).

Monitoraggio intraoperatorio dei nervi laringei ricorrenti (IONM)
Le lesioni dei nervi laringei inferiori rappresentano una delle più temibili complicanze
post-tiroidectomia e il contenzioso medico-legale è sempre più frequente (3, 60-62). E’
noto, peraltro, che all'integrità anatomica del nervo non sempre corrisponde l’integrità
funzionale e, pertanto, parte delle lesioni ricorrenziali sono misconosciute in sede intraoperatoria (63-64). Diverse tecniche sono state proposte per il monitoraggio intraoperatorio
del nervo ricorrente (Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring: IONM), ma il metodo più diffuso e
standardizzato è quello che impiega elettrodi sulla superficie del tubo endotracheale, a
contatto con la mucosa delle corde vocali (65, 66). L’utilizzo dell’IONM si può associare a
un beneficio in termini di lesioni ricorrenziali temporanee (67). Tuttavia, a fronte di una
sensibilità >90% (65), la specificità è molto variabile (30-80%) (65-66, 68-69) e il tasso di
falsi positivi è elevato. Un impiego selettivo dell’IONM, proposto in casi ad alto rischio
(re-interventi, patologia maligna e gozzi immersi) in considerazione del migliorato
outcome postoperatorio (70), non ha trovato conferma in altre esperienze (71).
L’impiego intraoperatorio dell’IONM, quindi, può essere preso in considerazione quale
ausilio in alcuni casi selezionati, ma non può sostituirsi a una adeguata e meticolosa
tecnica chirurgica basata sulla conoscenza della anatomia del nervo e delle sua varianti.
Risultati più promettenti sono da attendersi dal monitoraggio continuo del nervo vago
(Continuous vagal IONM: CIONM) che consente una valutazione real-time del nervo
ricorrente durante le manovre chirurgiche e, pertanto, potrebbe facilitare la prevenzione
intraoperatoria delle lesioni ricorrenziali (72).
TERAPIA CHIRURGICA NELL’IPERTIROIDISMO
 Adenoma tossico isolato: loboistmectomia, soprattutto in presenza di noduli ≥3 cm, sintomi
compressivi, scarsa compliance del paziente alla terapia con radioiodio (73).
 Gozzo multinodulare tossico: tiroidectomia totale (73);
 M. di Flajani-Basedow-Graves: tiroidectomia totale (indicata in caso di intolleranza,
inefficacia o recidiva dopo trattamento tireostatico o laddove le dimensioni notevoli della
55
tiroide, la sintomatologia compressiva, l’età giovane del paziente, e/o la presenza di
patologia nodulare controindichino il trattamento con radioiodio. L’associazione di
oftalmopatia severa rappresenta una ulteriore indicazione al trattamento chirurgico (33; 73).
TERAPIA CHIRURGICA NELL’EUTIROIDISMO

Patologia nodulare monolaterale (citologia negativa; lobo controlaterale indenne):
loboistmectomia (74).

Gozzo multinodulare: tiroidectomia totale (36-37).
❑ TERAPIA CHIRURGICA DEL GOZZO CERVICOMEDIASTINICO
Il gozzo cervicomediastinico, per definizione, si estende nel mediastino per almeno il 50% del
suo volume. La sua incidenza è riportata tra l’1% e il 30%. e le procedure chirurgiche,
condizionate dalle condizioni anatomiche che lo sviluppo intratoracico determina, sono gravate
di una maggiore incidenza di complicanze (75-76). Viene classificato in primario (molto raro,
origina da tessuto tiroideo ectopico mediastinico, senza connessione con la ghiandola in sede
cervicale, e con vascolarizzazione a partenza dall’aorta, dalla arteria anonima o mammaria
interna) e secondario (a partenza dalla tiroide con la quale mantiene connessioni vascolari,
parenchimali o fibrose). Il trattamento del gozzo cervicomedistinico è la tiroidectomia totale con
accesso cervicotomico, possibile in oltre il 90% dei casi (75-77). La sternotomia e/o la
toracotomia complementare sono necessarie nei casi di patologia maligna con infiltrazione locoregionale mediastinica, nei rari casi di gozzo cervicomediastinico primario (75-76) o qualora la
componente mediastinica e/o la sede retrovascolare del gozzo sia di tale entità da renderne
pericolosa o impossibile l’asportazione attraverso la cervicotomia.
TERAPIA CHIRURGICA NELLA PATOLOGIA MALIGNA TIROIDEA:
 Carcinoma differenziato (papillare e follicolare).Il trattamento chirurgico deve garantire
radicalità con eliminazione di tutti i focolai tumorali ed essere associato a minima incidenza
di complicanze postoperatorie.
L’estensione della tiroidectomia (emitiroidectomia vs tiroidectomia totale) nel carcinoma
differenziato della tiroide resta oggetto di dibattito in quanto mancano evidenze di primo
livello che dimostrino la superiorità di un trattamento chirurgico più aggressivo in termini di
rischio di recidiva di malattia e sopravvivenza assoluta (78). La tiroidectomia totale ben
eseguita è associata a un’incidenza di complicanze relativamente bassa, assicura un buon
controllo loco-regionale di malattia eradicando anche eventuali foci neoplastici microscopici
56
(frequenti e spesso bilaterali), facilita la successiva terapia radiometabolica e consente il
dosaggio della tireoglobulina sierica nel follow up. Di contro, l’emitiroidectomia viene
proposta per il rischio relativamente basso di recidiva a fronte di complicanze postoperatorie ovviamente dimezzate rispetto alla tiroidectomia totale (78). Dall’esame della
letteratura sembra ragionevole ritenere la tiroidectomia totale il trattamento di scelta per la
maggioranza dei pazienti affetti da carcinomi differenziati della tiroide, mentre la
loboistmectomia può essere considerata adeguata in pazienti con diagnosi di
microcarcinoma papillare unifocale non infiltrante, in assenza di malattia linfonodale e di
pattern istologico non aggressivo (3, 7, 79).
 Carcinoma midollare: Per il trattamento del T, la tiroidectomia totale è l’unico trattamento
potenzialmente curativo (3, 6, 7, 80), sia nelle forme sporadiche (70%) sia nelle forme
ereditarie (30%), isolate o associate a Neoplasie Endocrine Multiple: MEN 2A o Sindrome
di Sipple (in associazione al feocromocitoma e all’iperparatiroidismo); MEN 2B o Sindrome
di Gorlin-Steinert (in associazione al feocromocitoma, a ganglioneuromatosi e habitus
marfanoide). Se è associato il feocromocitoma, prima della tiroidectomia o contestualmente,
previa
adeguata
preparazione
farmacologica,
va
programmata
ed
eseguita
la
surrenalectomia. Se presente, sarà trattata contestualmente alla tiroidectomia la patologia
paratiroidea. Per la linfoadenectomia si rimanda al capitolo relativo.
 Carcinoma indifferenziato o anaplastico. L’elevata aggressività determina una prognosi
infausta nella maggioranza dei casi (mediana di sopravvivenza di circa 5 mesi). Tuttavia,
negli ultimi anni è stata registrata una riduzione della sua incidenza, correlata anche alla
diagnosi precoce e al conseguente trattamento negli stadi iniziali degli istotipi differenziati.
Nel sospetto di carcinoma anaplastico è fondamentale l’inquadramento clinico-strumentale
della malattia da parte di un team multidisciplinare (chirurgo, anatomopatologo, oncologo,
radioterapista, radiologo) per la valutazione di possibilità di cura, vantaggi e svantaggi dei
trattamenti proposti. L’esordio clinico è generalmente caratterizzato da un’estesa
infiltrazione loco-regionale e/o metastasi a distanza, ma non sono rari i casi di riscontro
incidentale all’esame istologico definitivo.
Tutti i carcinomi anaplastici della tiroide sono considerati stadio IV (AJCC/UICC): i
pazienti in stadio IVa e IVb possono essere potenziali candidati a un trattamento
multimodale che comprenda una resezione chirurgica con intenti più o meno radicali
coadiuvata da radio- e chemioterapia, che, in alcuni casi consente la successiva riesplorazione chirurgica finalizzata al controllo loco-regionale di malattia. Nei pazienti in
stadio IVc, infine, le opzioni di trattamento rimangono limitate e controverse e le cure sono
57
finalizzate, per lo più, con intento palliativo a migliorare per quanto possibile la qualità di
vita dei pazienti (tracheotomia, endoprotesi tracheali o esofagee) (81).

LINFOADENECTOMIA
 Carcinoma differenziato. Metastasi linfonodali loco-regionali alla diagnosi sono descritte
nel 30-60% dei pazienti (82-83). Il significato prognostico del coinvolgimento
linfonodale e, di conseguenza, le indicazioni e l’estensione della linfoadenectomia sono
ancora oggetto di dibattito (82-83). La presenza di metastasi linfonodali é associata ad
aumentato rischio di recidiva di malattia e a riduzione della sopravvivenza (84). Per
questo motivo, in presenza di metastasi linfonodali accertate pre- o intra-operatoriamente
é indicata la linfoadenectomia terapeutica estesa ai livelli linfonodali coinvolti (7):
linfoadenectomia del VI livello se coinvolgimento dei linfonodi del compartimento
centrale; linfoadenectomia latero-cervicale in caso di coinvolgimento (omo- e/o
bilaterale) dei livelli linfonodali laterocervicali.
Il ruolo e l’estensione della linfoadenectomia profilattica nel carcinoma differenziato
della tiroide, in assenza di evidenza pre- e intra-operatoria di coinvolgimento linfonodale
(cN0) è tutt’oggi dibattuto (78).
E’ noto che la linfoadenectomia profilattica del compartimento centrale può associarsi a
un maggiore rischio di complicanze post-operatorie (ipoparatiroidismo e deficit
ricorrenziale), in assenza di evidenze scientifiche di primo livello che ne confermino i
vantaggi. Tuttavia, comporta tra i potenziali vantaggi: riduzione della recidiva di malattia
e dei valori di tireoglobulina sierica post-operatoria, più accurata stadiazione e selezione
dei pazienti, nei quali è indicato il trattamento con radioiodio (78).
Sebbene la dimensione della neoplasia sia considerata uno dei fattori di rischio di
metastasi linfonodali occulte del compartimento centrale, è dimostrato che i
microcarcinomi si comportano come i tumori di maggiori dimensioni in termini di
aggressività biologica e di rischio di metastasi loco-regionali (linfonodali) e/o a distanza
(85). In definitiva, non vi sono parametri pre-operatori (età, sesso, dimensioni del
tumore) in grado di identificare con sicurezza una popolazione “a rischio” che possa
beneficiare di una linfoadenectomia profilattica del compartimento centrale (86).
Per ridurre il rischio di complicanze, legato alla linfoadenectomia profilattica del
compartimento
centrale,
è
stata
proposta
la
linfoadenectomia
profilattica
dell’emicompartimento centrale omolaterale alla neoplasia con o senza esame istologico
58
estemporaneo sui linfonodi asportati, nei tumori clinicamente unifocali e cN0 (83, 8789).
La linfoadenectomia laterocervicale profilattica nei pazienti affetti da carcinoma
differenziato della tiroide non è indicata. La linfoadenectomia funzionale laterocervicale
terapeutica (livelli II-III-IV-V) omolaterale alla lesione o bilaterale deve essere eseguita,
se presenti metastasi linfonodali documentate (ecografia, esame citologico, dosaggio
della Tg sul liquido di lavaggio dell’agoaspirato, esame istologico estemporaneo durante
la chirurgia) (7). La linfoadenectomia laterocervicale deve essere completa (livelli II, III,
IV e V), orientata per compartimenti e non selettiva, cioè non limitata ai livelli
macroscopicamente coinvolti (6-7).
 Carcinoma midollare: Si caratterizza per una precoce e variabile diffusione metastatica
ai linfonodi del compartimento centrale (50-81%) e latero-cervicale (34-81%) (90). E’
evidente che un’accurata dissezione dei linfonodi del collo, laddove indicata, riveste
un’importanza fondamentale nel trattamento di questa malattia. La tiroidectomia totale
associata alla linfoadenectomia del compartimento centrale (VI livello) è generalmente
considerata il trattamento di minima per tumori >5 mm (91). Tuttavia, l’indicazione e
l’estensione della linfoadenectomia latero-cervicale rimane controversa (6, 80). Infatti,
nelle recenti linee guida dell’”American Thyroid Association (ATA)” non vi è unanime
consenso
a
raccomandare
la
linfoadenectomia
latero-cervicale
profilattica
(Raccomandazione 25) (80). Gli approcci proposti comprendono: la linfoadenectomia
latero-cervicale bilaterale profilattica in caso di tumori palpabili e/o metastasi laterocervicali omolaterali alla neoplasia e/o elevati valori di calcitonina (> 200 pg/ml) (6, 80);
la linfoadenectomia latero-cervicale omolaterale alla neoplasia profilattica in caso di
tumori palpabili e/o livelli di calcitonina moderatamente aumentati (tra 20 e 200 pg/ml)
(6, 80), la linfoadenectomia terapeutica latero-cervicale omolaterale alla neoplasia, in
caso di metastasi linfonodali latero-cervicali note pre-operatoriamente e/o riscontrate
intra-operatoriamente (6, 80, 92-93).

Carcinoma anaplastico. La linfoadenectomia deve essere presa in considerazione, in
caso di coinvolgimento linfonodale, se si associa a un intervento con intento radicale
(81).

DRENAGGIO. L’uso del drenaggio nella chirurgia tiroidea risulta essere molto diffuso,
sebbene molti studi dimostrino l’assenza di un reale beneficio nel controllo del
59
sanguinamento post-operatorio (94). La potenziale utilità, tuttavia, deve essere riportata alla
situazione clinica e, comunque, consigliabile in aspirazione.
L’ESAME ISTOLOGICO. L’esame istologico definitivo sulla ghiandola dopo asportazione

chirurgica è obbligatorio.
È sempre consigliabile, per un’adeguata descrizione istologica, l’orientamento della
ghiandola con applicazione di filo sul polo superiore del lobo destro. E’ opportuno che il
chirurgo non sezioni il pezzo operatorio per non inficiare l’esame macroscopico del
patologo.
L’indicazione all’esame istologico estemporaneo potrebbe trovare indicazione nella
conferma di noduli sospetti (Tir 4 alla citologia, secondo la classificazione SIAPEC 2014)
(16) o di metastasi linfonodali. Non è utile nei noduli con citologia follicolare indeterminata
(Classificazione SIAPEC 2014) (16) perché non diagnostico (95).
Trattamento post operatorio
La gestione post-operatoria è affidata al personale medico e infermieristico, qualificato e addestrato
a riconoscere precocemente e trattare eventuali complicanze quali la dispnea, l’emorragia e la crisi
ipocalcemica.
ASSISTENZA INFERMIERISTICA:

controllo della medicazione chirurgica, preferibilmente di piccole dimensioni, per non
ritardare il rilievo di tumefazioni del collo da raccolte emorragiche;

controllo della pervietà e della corretta aspirazione dei drenaggi, se presenti;

monitoraggio della pressione arteriosa;

convocazione urgente del medico di guardia al letto del paziente in caso di:

o
abbondante perdita ematica dai drenaggi;
o
presenza di turgore cervicale ingravescente;
o
comparsa di agitazione, dispnea o senso di costrizione al collo;
o
segni clinici di ipocalcemia (parestesie, segno di Trousseau);
monitoraggio postoperatorio della Calcemia e/o del PTH post-operatori dopo tiroidectomia
totale.
60

ASSISTENZA MEDICA:

in caso di ematoma cervicale con sintomatologia compressiva, rimozione immediata della
medicazione e della sutura cutanea, sottocutanea e muscolare a scopo decompressivo,
anche al letto del malato, se le condizioni cliniche lo richiedono, predisponendo la sala
operatoria per la ri-esplorazione delle logge tiroidee e il perfezionamento dell’emostasi,
laddove indicato;

controllo della ferita e rimozione del drenaggio prima della dimissione;
 se presente ipocalcemia sintomatica ingravescente (parestesie, crisi tetanica) nonostante la
terapia orale, dopo dosaggio urgente della calcemia, infusione e.v. di Calcio Gluconato;
 per il trattamento dell’ipocalcemia asintomatica si rimanda al paragrafo successivo (cfr.
Prevenzione e Gestione delle complicanze maggiori – IPOPARATIROIDISMO)
 terapia sostitutiva con l-tiroxina a dosi adeguate in rapporto al peso, all’età e all’estensione
della tiroidectomia (loboistmectomia versus tiroidectomia totale), in tutti i casi. La
modulazione individuale del dosaggio di l-tiroxina sarà guidato del dosaggio di fT4, TSH a
circa 40 giorni dall’intervento chirurgico. Nel caso di esame istologico di malignità
incidentale, laddove l’endocrinologo e/o il medico nucleare abbiano posto indicazione a
terapia complementare con radioiodio si applica il protocollo del carcinoma.
Prevenzione e trattamento delle complicanze maggiori
EMATOMA COMPRESSIVO:
L’ematoma post-tiroidectomia è una temibile complicanza che può condurre a gravi conseguenze
come ipossia, disturbi neurologici e morte (3, 60). Il termine “ematoma compressivo” è ben noto
nella letteratura medica e indica la possibile compromissione delle vie respiratorie. I fattori di
rischio possono essere legati al paziente, alla patologia tiroidea e al chirurgo (60). I fattori di
rischio correlati al paziente sono essenzialmente caratterizzati da una storia di coagulopatia
(emofilia, malattia di von Willebrand, insufficienza renale cronica ed emodialisi, epatopatie,
ecc.) e all’uso di anticoagulanti o antiaggreganti. Per ciò che concerne il rischio legato alla
patologia, il gozzo tossico e il morbo di Basedow – Graves rappresentano un presunto fattore di
rischio di sanguinamento postoperatorio. Anche gozzi immersi, intratoracici o recidivi sono a
rischio di emorragia postoperatoria (60, 96). I rischi correlati al chirurgo riguardano
l’applicazione di una tecnica chirurgica meticolosa (60). Anche la via di accesso chirurgico, con
la sezione dei muscoli pretiroidei e la resezione parziale di tessuto tiroideo, può rappresentare
61
una causa di sanguinamento (96) così come la lesione delle giugulari anteriori. Durante la fase di
emostasi può essere utile la manovra di Valsalva, simulata dall’anestesista, che può evidenziare
potenziali fonti di sanguinamento venoso. L’incompleto accostamento dei muscoli pretiroidei,
con una soluzione di continuo all’estremità caudale della linea alba, è una misura che agevola la
decompressione spontanea dell’ematoma in caso di emorragia (97). In caso di ematoma
sintomatico, la diagnosi precoce, l’apertura immediata della ferita e la revisione chirurgica sono
necessari. L’evacuazione dei coaguli e il perfezionamento dell’emostasi rappresentano il
trattamento definitivo di questa complicanza potenzialmente letale ed è da preferire
all’osservazione prolungata. Il trattamento conservativo deve essere considerato solo nei casi di
ematomi asintomatici e autolimitanti.
IPOPARATIROIDISMO:
 Se durante l’intervento si verifica la devascolarizzazione o l’asportazione accidentale di una
paratiroide, deve essere effettuato il rimpianto della ghiandola in una tasca del muscolo
sternocleidomastoideo omolaterale, dopo frammentazione con il bisturi per aumentarne la
superficie di contatto con il muscolo ricevente, eventualmente previo esame al congelatore
per verificarne, in caso di dubbio, la natura paratiroidea e l’assenza di eventuali note
patologiche di iperplasia (3, 98). E’ opportuno chiudere la tasca muscolare, dopo accurata
emostasi per evitare l’insorgenza di ematomi che compromettano la ripresa funzionale del
tessuto, con un filo non riassorbibile (es. Prolene 2/0 o 3/0) con funzione di repere in caso
fosse necessario, in futuro, rimuovere il reimpianto (insorgenza di iperparatiroidismo
primario o secondario a insufficienza renale cronica) (3, 98).
 In caso di congestione venosa, può essere utile l’incisione della capsula a scopo
decompressivo (3, 98).
 L’insorgenza di ipocalcemia sintomatica, nonostante terapia orale con calcio carbonato e
calcitriolo, richiede l’infusione endovenosa di Calcio Gluconato 2 fiale 10 ml (2 g) in
soluzione fisiologica 250 cc., dopo prelievo per il dosaggio della calcemia, fino a scomparsa
della sintomatologia.
 La somministrazione profilattica, preoperatoria, con calcio e calcitriolo con l’obiettivo di
azzerare il rischio di ipocalcemia sintomatica postoperatoria, non trova unanimi consensi
(99-100).
 Per il trattamento dell’ipocalcemia post-operatoria (≤8 mg/dl) può essere utile, sulla base
delle recenti evidenze di letteratura (101-102) integrare i valori del calcio e del PTH al fine
di modulare in maniera selettiva il trattamento dei pazienti. In presenza di valori normali di
62
PTH l’ipocalcemia è generalmente controllata con Calcio Carbonato per os (2-6 g)
distribuito in almeno tre somministrazioni giornaliere. Nei casi in cui all’ipocalcemia si
associ un’ipoparatormonemia è opportuno associare al trattamento suppletivo con calcio
carbonato il calcitriolo (0,50–1,5 mcg/die), da assumere
anche a domicilio con
monitoraggio settimanale della calcemia e progressiva riduzione dei dosaggi, laddove
possibile (103). Da evitare preparazioni di Calcio con aggiunta di Sodio nei pazienti anziani
e ipertesi.
LESIONI TRANSITORIE O DEFINITIVE DEL NERVO RICORRENTE (3, 60)
 Le sezioni ricorrenziali riconosciute intraoperatoriamente possono essere riparate con
tecniche di ricostruzione microchirurgiche. La ricostruzione del nervo può essere effettuata
tramite neurorrafia termino-terminale, fascicolare, o utilizzando un innesto. E’ stata anche
descritta l’anastomosi tra il nervo laringeo inferiore e l’ansa dell’ipoglosso, in particolare la
branca terminale diretta al muscolo sternotiroideo. Tali tecniche che, comunque, non
ripristinano la motilità della corda vocale possono contribuire a migliorarne il tono e il
trofismo muscolare, con effetti talvolta positivi sulla la funzione fonatoria e ventilatoria
(104).
 In caso di distress respiratorio al momento dell’estubazione per diplegia cordale, evitare la
tracheotomia immediata e mantenere il paziente intubato per le 24 h successive. Solo allora
si tenterà di rimuovere il tubo endotracheale con l’assistenza fibroscopica che verifichi la
ripresa della mobilità di almeno una corda vocale.
 La persistenza di diplegia obbliga al mantenimento della intubazione per altre 24 ore.
 L’ulteriore persistenza di diplegia in adduzione delle corde vocali consiglia la tracheotomia.
 La diplegia fonatoria con sufficiente spazio respiratorio (corde in posizione paramediana)
non necessita di tracheotomia, mentre va effettuata la rieducazione logopedica su
indicazione dello specialista otorino/foniatra.
 La monoplegia cordale generalmente necessita di sola rieducazione logopedica su
indicazione dello specialista otorino/foniatra, previa eventuale documentazione iconografia
(registrazione della fibrolaringoscopia).
 La concomitanza di disfagia severa ai liquidi, spesso accompagnata da fenomeni inalatori,
impone l’aggiunta di sostanze addensanti ai liquidi, deglutibili sotto forma di gelatina.
 In tutti i casi occorre riportare accuratamente nel diario clinico le osservazioni cliniche e
tutti i trattamenti proposti e/o effettuati.
63
Dimissione ospedaliera e informazioni al paziente
Il paziente viene informato della probabile dimissione il giorno precedente. Il giorno stabilito, dopo
la visita medica, la medicazione e la verifica dei valori di calcemia in caso di tiroidectomia totale,
viene confermato il rientro al domicilio e consegnata la relativa documentazione clinica.
Tempi
Per i soli pazienti sottoposti a lobo-istmectomia, nei casi in cui le condizioni anamnestiche, cliniche,
familiari e logistiche lo consentano, è possibile il regime di one-day surgery (105).
Da alcuni Autori tale regime è stato proposto anche per i pazienti sottoposti a tiroidectomia totale
per patologia benigna (106-107). Rimane sconsigliata la day surgery e, ancor di più, l’ambulatory
surgery (105, 108). In questo tipo di intervento, oltre alle complicanze immediate, bisogna tener
conto dell’ipocalcemia post-operatoria. La terapia calcica di supporto per tutti i pazienti sottoposti a
tiroidectomia totale, indipendentemente dai valori di calcemia, (99, 100, 109, 110) può essere un
overtreatment e un costo aggiuntivo (102); oltre a potere causare la comparsa di ipercalcemia
iatrogena (111).
Documentazione informativa
LETTERA DI DIMISSIONE
Al momento della dimissione va consegnata al paziente una relazione clinica completa (con copia
inserita nella cartella clinica) indirizzata al suo medico curante, firmata dal medico di reparto che
esegue la dimissione e che contenga come elementi essenziali:
 data e diagnosi al momento del ricovero;
 principali esami diagnostici (di laboratorio e strumentali) eseguiti durante la degenza, con
evidenza di quelli alterati;
 data e definizione dell’intervento chirurgico, con segnalazione di eventuali difficoltà intraoperatorie riscontrate ed eventuale reimpianto di tessuto paratiroideo;
 decorso postoperatorio che evidenzi le eventuali complicanze (emorragia, dispnea, disfagia,
disfonia, ipocalcemia, ecc.);
 terapia farmacologica somministrata al paziente;
 diagnosi alla dimissione (se disponibile, l’esame istologico definitivo);
64
 prescrizioni terapeutiche domiciliari, con dettagliata indicazione di posologia e modalità di
somministrazione;
 educazione del paziente alla gestione della ferita chirurgica e al precoce riconoscimento di
sintomi di ipocalcemia;
 controlli clinici e/o diagnostici raccomandati e/o programmati;
 appuntamento per visita ORL/Foniatrica di monitoraggio in caso di disfonia e programma di
riabilitazione in presenza di alterazioni documentate nella motilità delle corde vocali;
 recapito telefonico diretto della struttura di ricovero.
Dopo la dimissione il paziente è preso in carico dal medico curante. Per i soggetti residenti fuori
regione, può essere opportune valutare con il paziente stesso o con i suoi familiari eventuali
problematiche legate ai mezzi di trasporto, alla lunghezza e al tipo di viaggio, in modo da stabilire il
momento più propizio per la dimissione e gli opportuni consigli.
Consigli pratici alla dimissione. – Può essere utile consegnare al paziente un foglio dove è riportata
una serie di informazioni pratiche, legate all’autogestione della sua convalescenza e i recapiti a cui
rivolgersi, in caso di necessità di un consiglio. Si riporta di seguito il modello proposto e adottato
dal CLUB delle U.E.C.
65
Consigli pratici dopo intervento di tiroidectomia
In caso di tiroidectomia parziale (cioè quando rimane una porzione di tiroide) è consigliata
l’assunzione di un’adeguata dose di ormone tiroideo e l’esecuzione di controlli ematochimici della
funzione tiroidea per prevenire l’ipertrofia del residuo, la formazione di altri noduli o un gozzo
recidivo.
In caso di tiroidectomia totale (asportazione completa della ghiandola) è obbligatoria l’assunzione
di ormone tiroideo alla dose necessaria, regolata da esami ematochimici di controllo per la
funzionalità tiroidea).
La compressa di l-tiroxina va assunta tutti i giorni al mattino e a digiuno (circa 20 minuti prima
della colazione), mentre il dosaggio dell’ormone andrà periodicamente controllato, su prescrizione
medica, eseguendo i seguenti esami ematochimici: fT4, TSH (la mattina del prelievo la compressa
non deve essere assunta). E’ l’endocrinologo che deve stabilire il giusto dosaggio.
Nel caso in cui il soggetto operato dimenticasse di assumere la compressa di l-tiroxina per uno o
pochi giorni, non si avranno conseguenza, né si dovrà cambiare il dosaggio quotidiano stabilito
per recuperare le dosi non assunte. Le scorte di ormone tiroideo, accumulate nel nostro organismo,
in caso di estrema necessità, sono tali da consentirne una disponibilità, pur decrescente, fino a
circa un mese e il paziente avvertirà progressivamente i sintomi della carenza ormonale
(affaticamento, stanchezza, svogliatezza, sonnolenza).
La cicatrice chirurgica si può considerare completamente guarita, anche ai fini estetici, soltanto
dopo circa tre mesi. Possono presentarsi, nelle settimane successive all’intervento, dei disturbi
alla deglutizione (sensazione di corpo estraneo in gola, fissità della cute del collo, senso di
tensione sulla pelle del petto), generalmente passeggeri e che regrediscono progressivamente.
Sono legati alla cicatrizzazione profonda della ferita con ostacolato scorrimento dei piani
muscolari del collo.
La voce, dopo l’intervento chirurgico, può subire delle modificazioni (non legate alla disfunzione
dei nervi laringei), pur rimanendo limpida, o indebolirsi (facile stancabilità e difficoltà a parlare ad
alta voce, urlare o cantare). Gran parte di questi disturbi regrediscono completamente in alcuni
mesi. In particolare, la modificazione del tono della voce è dovuta al venire meno della
compressione sull’organo della fonazione (la laringe) da parte della tiroide ingrossata (gozzo) e ai
fenomeni cicatriziali e aderenziali post-intervento che modificano la dinamica laringea.
Dopo l’intervento il paziente potrà muovere liberamente il collo e non sarà necessario coprire la
cicatrice chirurgica se non per qualche giorno. La convalescenza richiesta è di solito breve, anche
dopo tiroidectomia totale, e può essere svolta senza limitazione alcuna ogni attività lavorativa,
familiare e della vita di relazione. La donna in età fertile potrà intraprendere una gravidanza e
allattare. L’unica raccomandazione è che per tutta la vita venga assunta in modo regolare la
terapia ormonale sostitutiva.
Può succedere che nel periodo post-operatorio precoce o già al proprio domicilio insorga
un’ipocalcemia i cui sintomi saranno stati spiegati dai medici al momento della dimissione. In
questo caso si consiglia di assumere con scrupolo la dose di calcio e/o vitamina D prescritta
giornalmente, effettuando controlli settimanali della calcemia, che si normalizza generalmente in
qualche settimana. Nel caso in cui nonostante la terapia persistessero formicolii agli arti, è
opportuno contattare subito il medico. In caso di ipocalcemia permanente, la dose di calcio e
vitamina D stabilita dovrà essere assunta quotidianamente e per tutta la vita con attenta
rivalutazione da parte del ginecologo e dell’endocrinologo nelle donne in gravidanza.
Per ogni ulteriore informazione o necessità telefonare al numero ……….
66
Ambulatorio e follow-up
Nell’ambulatorio di Endocrinochirurgia si effettuano:

Prime visite di pazienti inviati dal Medico Curante, dall’Endocrinologo o dal servizio di
Anatomia Patologica. Ai pazienti a cui si propone il ricovero per intervento vanno fornite subito
adeguate informazioni su:
 indicazioni al trattamento chirurgico;
 eventuali terapia alternative;
 vantaggi che possono derivare dall’intervento e i possibili rischi legati alla metodica
operatoria da attuare;
 descrizione dettagliata delle complicanze post-operatorie transitorie e definitive.
Si rilascia al paziente una relazione clinica in cui sono riportati chiaramente:
 note anamnestiche con particolare riguardo a eventuali patologie di cui il paziente soffre e
meritevoli di particolare segnalazione;
 esame obiettivo;
 diagnosi;
 terapia proposta;
 eventuali approfondimenti diagnostici richiesti;
 eventuale concordanza o no con altre consulenze specialistiche portate in visione;
 in caso di proposta di intervento chirurgico, va fatto esplicito riferimento alle informazioni
fornite al paziente al fine di un preliminare consenso al trattamento indicato;
 proposta di ricovero, segnalando eventuali priorità.

Visite di controllo se c’è necessità di medicazioni chirurgiche, altrimenti il paziente andrà
indirizzato presso l’ambulatorio di Endocrinologia dove effettuerà il follow-up.

Visita ORL di controllo, eventualmente con fibrolaringoscopia per verificare la normale motilità
delle corde vocali, in caso di sintomatologia (disfonia) ed eventuale riabilitazione logopedica,
sempre su indicazione dello specialista otorinolaringoiatra e/o foniatra.
Soprattutto per i pazienti affetti da carcinoma tiroideo è opportuno garantire la presenza, in tutte le
fasi del percorso diagnostico-terapeutico, delle competenze dell’endocrinologo, del medico
nucleare, del patologo, del radiologo e concordare collegialmente per i casi più impegnativi l’iter
più appropriato.
Per i pazienti con carcinoma differenziato l’indicazione al trattamento postoperatorio con radioiodio
va posta sulla base dei fattori di rischio di recidiva. In particolare, il trattamento con radioiodio è
indicato nei casi classificati a rischio alto o intermedio ovvero in presenza di metastasi a distanza,
67
invasione extratiroidea macroscopica, angioinvasività, dimensioni del tumore >4 cm, istologia
aggressiva (tall cell, variante colonnare, variante insulare), metastasi linfonodali (7).
Per i tumori di diametro <1 cm, anche plurifocali, confinati alla tiroide, il trattamento con
radioiodio non è generalmente raccomandato, essendo questi casi classificati a basso rischio di
recidiva (7).
La stratificazione del rischio è essenziale non solo per stabilire l’appropriato trattamento
postoperatorio con radioiodio, ma anche per determinare l’adeguata terapia tireosoppressiva e per
programmare l’intensità e la frequenza del follow-up.
A seconda del decorso clinico della malattia e della risposta alla terapia, il rischio di recidiva e di
mortalità può variare nel tempo. Sulla base delle informazioni ottenute in corso di follow-up, può
essere utile una riclassificazione del rischio, essenziale per assicurare un’appropriata gestione (7,
112). E’ auspicabile la disponibilità di un database consultabile e aggiornabile in qualsiasi momento
da tutti i membri del team multidisciplinare, che contenga le informazioni essenziali per la
programmazione e l’attuazione di un percorso personalizzato per ogni paziente (stratificazione del
rischio, trattamento adiuvante, follow-up) (113).
68
References
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Curtis RE, Rowlings PA, Deeg HJ et al. Solid cancers after bone marrow transplantation. N
Engl J Med 1997;336(13):897–904.
Pacini F, Vorontsova T, Demidchik EP et al. Post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinoma in Belarus
children and adolescents: comparison with naturally occurring thyroid carcinoma in Italy and
France. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1997;82(11):3563-9.
Rosato L, De Toma G, Bellantone R et al. Diagnostic, therapeutic and healthcare management
protocols in thyroid surgery: 3rd consensus conference of the Italian association of endocrine
surgery units (U.E.C. CLUB). Minerva Chir 2012;67(5):365-379.
Elisei R, Bottici V , Luchetti F et al. Impact of routine measurement of serum calcitonin on
the diagnosis and outcome of medullary thyroid cancer: experience in 10 864 patients with
nodular thyroid disorders. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:163-168.
Gharib H, Papini E, Paschke R et al. AACE/AME/ETA Task Force on Thyroid Nodules.
American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, Associazione Medici Endocrinologi, and
EuropeanThyroid Association Medical Guidelines for Clinical Practice for the Diagnosis and
Management of Thyroid Nodules. Endocr Pract 2010;16 Suppl 1:1-43.
Dralle H, Musholt TJ, Schabram J et al. German Association of Endocrine Surgeons practice
guideline for the surgical management of malignant thyroid tumors. Langenbecks Arch Surg
2013;398:347-375.
Cooper DS, Doherty GM, Haugen BR et al. Revised American Thyroid Association
management guidelines for patients with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer.
Thyroid 2009;19:1167–1214.
Cheung K, Roman SA, Wang TS et al. Calcitonin measurement in the evaluation of thyroid
nodules in the United States: a cost-effectiveness and decision analysis. J Clin Endocrinol
Metab 2008;93(6):2173-80.
Blum M. Ultrasonography of the Thyroid. In: De Groot LJ, Beck-Peccoz P, Chrousos G,
Dungan K, Grossman A, Hershman JM, Koch C, McLachlan R, New M, Rebar R, Singer F,
Vinik A, Weickert MO, editors. Endotext [Internet]. South Dartmouth (MA): MDText.com,
Inc.; 2000-2012 Feb 28.
Papini E, Guglielmi R, Bianchini A et al. Risk of malignancy in nonpalpable thyroid nodules:
predictive value of ultrasound and color-Doppler features. J Clin Endocrinol Metab
2002;87:1941-1946.
Yeh MW, Bauer AJ, Bernet VA et al. American Thyroid Association statement on
preoperative imaging for thyroid cancer surgery. Thyroid 2015;25(1):3-14.
Yu D, Han Y, Chen T. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for differentiation of benign and
malignant thyroid lesions: meta-analysis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014;151:909-915.
Intenzo C, Jabbour S, Miller JL et al. Subclinical hyperthyroidism: current concepts and
scintigraphic imaging. Clin Nucl Med 2011;36(9):e107-113.
Kahaly GJ, Bartalena L, Hegedüs L. The American Thyroid Association/American
Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines for hyperthyroidism and other causes of
thyrotoxicosis: a European perspective. Thyroid 2011;21(6):585-591.
Bellantone R, Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M et al. Management of cystic or predominantly cystic
thyroid nodules: the role of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Thyroid
2004;14(1):43-47.
Nardi F, Basolo F, Crescenzi A et al. Italian consensus for the classification and reporting of
thyroid cytology. J Endocrinol Invest 2014;37(6):593-599.
Giovanella L, Bongiovanni M, Trimboli P. Diagnostic value of thyroglobulin assay in cervical
lymph node fine-needle aspirations for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer. Curr Opin
Oncol 2013;25(1):6-13.
69
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
De Crea C, Raffaelli M, Maccora D et al. Calcitonin measurement in fine-needle aspirate
washouts vs. cytologic examination for diagnosis of primary or metastatic medullary thyroid
carcinoma. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 2014;34(6):399-405.
Chen BT, Jain AB, Dagis A et al. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided
core needle biopsy versus fine-needle aspiration for evaluating thyroid nodules. Endocr Pract
2015;21(2):128-135.
Kahara T, Ichikawa T, Taniguchi H et al. Mediastinal thyroid goiter with no accumulation on
scintigraphy. Intern Med 2013; 52:2159.
Moschetta M, Ianora AA, Testini M et al. Multidetector computed tomography in the
preoperative evaluation of retrosternal goiters: a useful procedure for patients for whom
magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated. Thyroid 2010;20:181-7.
Lauri C, Di Traglia S, Galli F et al. Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid
cancer with second generation radiopharmaceuticals. Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging
2015;59:105-115.
Deandreis D, Al Ghuzlan A, Auperin A et al. Is (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT Useful for
the Presurgical Characterization of Thyroid Nodules with Indeterminate Fine Needle
Aspiration Cytology? Thyroid 2012; 22:165-172.
Agrawal K, Weaver J, Ngu R et al. Clinical significance of patterns of incidental thyroid
uptake at 18F-FDG PET/CT. Clin Radiol 2015 Feb 13 pii: S0009-9260(15)00024-0.
Dudea SM, Botar-Jid C. Ultrasound elastography in thyroid disease. Med Ultrason
2015;17:74-96.
Dalton N, Viale JP, Gueugniaud PY et al. Administration périopératoire de bêtabloquants:
enquête de pratique. Annales françaises d’Anesthésie et de Réanimation 2004; 23: 1057-1062.
Gentile I, Rosato L, Avenia N et al. Do italian surgeons use antibiotic prophylaxis in thyroid
surgery? Results from a national study (UEC – Italian Endocrine Surgery Units Association).
Ann Ital Chir 2014 Jan-Feb; 85 (1): 33-7.
Gould MK, Garcia DA, Wren SM et al. American College of Chest Physicians. Prevention of
VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of
Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice
Guidelines. Chest 2012; 141(2 Suppl): e227S-277S.
Delfrate R, Lampugnani R, Rosato L. Complicanze da posizione sul letto operatorio e lesioni
del plesso brachiale. In Rosato L. Trattato Italiano di Endocrinochirurgia. Ed. CLUB delle
U.E.C. – Grafica Santhiatese, novembre 2008, Vol. I: 403-404.
Federazione Nazionale degli Ordini dei Medici Chirurghi e degli Odontoiatri. Codice di
Deontologia Medica 2014 - capo IV° Informazione e Comunicazione Consenso e Dissenso,
artt. 33-39.
Carneiro-Pla D, Amin S. Comparison between preconsultation ultrasonography and office
surgeon-performed ultrasound in patients with thyroid cancer. World J Sur. 2014;38(3):622-7.
Oltmann SC, Schneider DF, Chen H et al. All thyroid ultrasound evaluations are not equal:
sonographers specialized in thyroid cancer correctly label clinical N0 disease in well
differentiated thyroid cancer. Ann Surg Oncol 2015;22(2):422-428.
Stalberg P, Svensson A, Hessman O et al. Surgical treatment of Graves’ disease: evidencebased approach. World J Surg 2008;32:1269-1277.
Rosato L, Pacini F, Panier Suffat L et al. Post-thyroidectomy chronic asthenia: self-deception
or disease? Endocrine 2015 Mar;48(2):615-20
Kebebew E, Clark OH. Differentiated thyroid cancer: ”complete” rational approach. World J
Surg 2000; 24:942-951.
Agarwal G, Aggarwal V. Is total thyroidectomy the surgical procedure of choice for benign
multinodular goiter? An evidence-based review. World J Surg 2008; 32:1313-1324.
Moalem J, Suh I, Duh QY. Treatment and prevention of recurrence of multinodular goiter: an
evidence-based review of the literature. World J Surg 2008; 32:1301-1312.
70
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
Tezelman S, Borucu YS, Tunca F et al. The Change in surgical practice from subtotal to neartotal or total thyroidectomy in the treatment of patients with benign multinodular goiter.
World J Surg 2009, 33: 400-405.
Bellantone R, Boscherini M, Lombardi CP et al. Is the identification of the external branch of
the superior laryngeal nerve mandatory in thyroid operation? Results of a prospective
randomized study. Surgery 2001;130(6):1055-1059.
Gagner M. Endoscopic subtotal parathyroidectomy in patients with primary
hyperparathyroidism. Br J Surg 1996; 83:875.
Linos D. Minimally invasive thyroidectomy: a comprehensive appraisal of existing
techniques. Surgery 2011;150(1):17-24.
Perigli G, Cortesini C, Qirici E et al. Clinical benefits of minimally invasive techniques in
thyroid surgery. World J.Surg 2008;32:45-50.
Slotema ET, Sebag F, Henry JF. What is the evidence for endoscopic thyroidectomy in the
management of benign thyroid disease. World J Surg 2008, 32:1325-1332.
Miccoli P, Berti P, Raffaelli M et al. Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy. Am J
Surg 2000; 181: 567-570.
Bellantone R, Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M. Tiroidectomia video-assistita. Enciclopédie
Médico-Chirurgicale - Tecniche Chirurgiche – Chirurgia Generale, I–46–460-A, Elsevier
SAS, Paris, Francia, 2004, pp 1-14.
Miccoli P, Minuto MN, Ugolini C et al. Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy for
benign thyroid disease: an evidence based review. World J Surg 2008; 32:1333-40.
Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, D’Alatri L et al. Video-assisted thyroidectomy significantly
reduces the risk of early postthyroidectomy voice and swallowing symptoms. R. World J Surg
2008; 32(5): 693-700.
Miccoli P, Pinchera A, Materazzi G et al. Surgical treatment of low- and intermediate-risk
papillary thyroid cancer with minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy. J Clin
Endocrinol Metab 2009; 94(5):1618-22.
Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, De Crea C et al. Report on 8 years of experience with videoassisted thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. Surgery 2007; 142: 944-51.
Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, De Crea C et al. Video-Assisted Versus Conventional Total
Thyroidectomy and Central Compartment Neck Dissection for Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.
World J Surg 2012; 36:1225-30.
Del Rio P, Arcuri MF, Cataldo S et al. Are we changing our inclusion criteria for the
minimally invasive videoassisted thyroidectomy? Ann Ital Chir 2014;85:28-32.
Lee J, Kang SW, Jung JJ et al. Multicenter study of robotic thyroidectomy: short-term
postoperative outcomes and surgeon ergonomic considerations. Ann Surg Oncol
2011;18(9):2538-47.
Richmond JD, Pattani KM, Benhidjeb T et al. Transoral robotic-assisted thyroidectomy: a
preclinical feasibility study in 2 cadavers. Head and Neck. 2011;33(3):330-3.
Terris DJ, Singer MC, Seybt MW. Robotic facelift thyroidectomy: patient selection and
technical considerations. Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2011: 21:237-42.
Lee KE, Koo Do H, Im HJ et al. Surgical completeness of bilateral axillo-breast approach
robotic thyroidectomy: comparison with conventional open thyroidectomy after propensity
score matching. Surgery 2011;150(6):1266-74.
Kang SW, Chung WY, Park CS. Robotic thyroid surgery using a gasless transaxillary
approach and the da Vinci S system: the operative outcomes of 338 consecutive patients.
Surgery 2009; 146:1048-55.
Piccoli M, Mullineris B, Gozzo D et al. Trans-axillary thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.
In: Spinoglio G. Robotic Surgery – Current application and new trends, Springer-Verlag Italia
2015, pp. 15- 22.
71
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
Berber E, Siperstein A. Robotic transaxillary total thyroidectomy using a unilateral approach.
Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech 2011; 21:207-210.
Kang SW, Chung WY, Park CS. Robot-assisted endoscopic surgery for thyroid cancer:
experience with the first 100 patients. Surg Endosc 2009: 23:2399-2406.
Lombardi CP, Raffaelli M, De Crea C et al. Complications in thyroid surgery. Minerva Chir
2007;62(5):395-408.
Rosato L, Avenia N, Bernante P et al. Complications of thyroid surgery: analysis of a
multicentric study on 14934 patients operated on in Italy over 5 years. World J Surg 2004; 28:
271-6.
Rosato L, Carlevato MT, De Toma G et al. Recurrent Laryngeal nerve damage and phonetic
modifications after total thyroidectomy: surgical malpractice only or predictable sequence?
World J Surg 2005; 29: 780-4.
Woodson GE. Pathophysiology of recurrent laryngeal nerve. In: Randolph GW, Ed. Surgery
of the thyroid and parathyroid glands Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Saunders; 2003: 366-373.
Bergenfelz A, Jansson S, Kristoffersson A et al. Complications to thyroid surgery: results as
reported in a database from a multicenter audit comprising 3,660 patients. Langenbecks Arch
Surg 2008; 393(5):667-673.
Randolph GW, Dralle H; International Intraoperative Monitoring Study Group, Abdullah H,
Barczynski M, Bellantone R et al. Electrophysiologic recurrent laryngeal nerve monitoring
during thyroid and parathyroid surgery: international standards guideline statement.
Laryngoscope 2011 Jan;121 Suppl 1:S1-16.
Dionigi G, Lombardi D, Lombardi CP et al. Working Group for Neural Monitoring in
Thyroid and Parathyroid Surgery in Italy. Intraoperative neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery:
a point prevalence survey on utilization, management, and documentation in Italy. Updates
Surg 2014 Dec;66(4):269-76
Barczyński M, Konturek A, Cichoń S. Randomized clinical trial of visualization versus
neuromonitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerves during thyroidectomy. Br J Surg
2009;96(3):240-246.
Hermann M, Hellebart C, Freissmuth M. Neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery: prospective
evaluation of intraoperative electrophysiological responses for the prediction of recurrent
laryngeal nerve injury. Ann Surg 2004; 240: 9-17.
Sitges-Serra, Fontané J, Dueñas JP et al. Prospective study on loss of signal on the first side
during neuromonitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in total thyroidectomy. Br J Surg
2013;100(5):662-666.
Chan WF, Lang BHH, Lo CY. The role of intraoperative neuromonitoring of recurrent
laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy: a comparative study of 1000 nerves at risk. Surgery
2006; 140:866-873.
Yarbrough DE, Thompson GB, Kasperbauer JL et al. Intraoperative electromyographic
monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve in reoperative thyroid and parathyroid surgery.
Surgery 2004; 136, 1107-1115.
Phelan E, Schneider R, Lorenz K et al. Continuous vagal IONM prevents recurrent laryngeal
nerve paralysis by revealing initial EMG changes of impending neuropraxic injury: a
prospective, multicenter study. Laryngoscope 2014;124(6):1498-1505.
Bahn Chair RS, Burch HB, Cooper DS et al. American Thyroid Association; American
Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Hyperthyroidism and other causes of thyrotoxicosis:
management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association and American Association of
Clinical Endocrinologists. Thyroid 2011;21(6):593-646.
Delbridge L. Solitary thyroid nodule: current managemant. Anz J Surg, 2006; 76:381-386.
Testini M, Gurrado A, Avenia N et al. Does Mediastinal Extension of the Goiter Increase
Morbidity of Total Thyroidectomy? A Multicenter Study of 19,662 Patients. Ann Surg Oncol
2011; 18(8):2251-9
72
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Ronti S et al. Substernal goiters: incidence, surgical approach, and
complications in a tertiary care referral center. Head Neck 2011; 33(10):1420-5
White ML, Doherty GM, Gauger PG. Evidence-based surgical management of substernal
goiter. World J Surg 2008;32:1285– 300
McLeod DSA, Sawka AM, Cooper DS. Controversies in primary treatment of low-risk
papillary thyroid cancer. Lancet 2013; 381:1046-1057.
Sippel R, Chen H. Controversies in the surgical management of newly diagnosed and
recurrent/residual thyroid cancer. Thyroid 2009; 12(19):1371-1380.
Wells SA Jr, Asa SL, Dralle H et al. Revised American Thyroid Association Guidelines for
the Management of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma The American Thyroid Association
Guidelines Task Force on Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma. Thyroid 2015; 26 [Epub ahead of
print].
Smallridge RC, Ain KB, Asa SL et al. American Thyroid Association Anaplastic Thyroid
Cancer Guidelines Taskforce. American Thyroid Association guidelines for management of
patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer. Thyroid 2012;22(11):1104-39.
Sancho JJ, Lennard TW, Paunovic I et al. Prophylactic central neck dissection in papillary
thyroid cancer: a consensus report of the European Society of Endocrine Surgeons (ESES).
Langenbecks Arch Surg 2014; 399:155-163.
Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L et al. Prospective evaluation of total thyroidectomy versus
ipsilateral versus bilateral central neck dissection in patients with clinically node negative
papillary thyroid carcinoma. Surgery 2012; 152:957-964.
White ML, Gauger PG, Doherty GM. Central lymph node dissection in differentiated thyroid
cancer. World J Surg 2007; 31:895-904.
Lombardi CP, Bellantone R, De Crea C et al. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma:
extrathyroidal extension, lymph node metastases, and risk factors for recurrence in a high
prevalence of goiter area. World J Surg 2010; 34:1214-21.
Giordano D, Valcavi R, Thompson GB et al. Complications of central neck dissection in
patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma: results of a study on 1087 patients and review of
the literature. Thyroid 2012; 22:911-7.
Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L et al. Can intraoperative frozen section influence the
estension of central neck dissection in cN0 papillary thyroid carcinoma? Langenbecks Arch
Surg 2013; 398:383-8.
Moo TA, Umunna B, Kato M et al. Ipsilateral versus bilateral central neck lymph node
dissection in papillary thyroid carcinoma. Ann Surg 2009; 250:403-8.
Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Sessa L et al. Ipsilateral Central Neck Dissection Plus Frozen Section
Examination Versus Prophylactic Bilateral Central Neck Dissection in cN0 Papillary Thyroid
Carcinoma. Ann Surg Oncol 2015; 5 [Epub ahead of print].
Cohen MS, Moley JF. Surgical treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma. J Intern Med
2003;253(6):616-626.
Dralle H, Machens A. Surgical approaches in thyroid cancer and lymph-node metastases. Best
Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2008;22(6):971-987.
Gimm O. Extent of surgery in clinically evident but operable MTC - when is central and/or
lateral lymphadenectomy indicated? Thyroid res 2013;14;6(suppl 1):s3.
Dralle H, Machens A. Surgical management of the lateral neck compartment for metastatic
thyroid cancer. Curr Opin Oncol 2013;25(1):20-26.
Woods RS, Woods JF, Duignan ES et al. Systematic review and meta-analysis of wound
drains after thyroid surgery. Br J Surg 2014;101(5):446-456.
Udelsman R, Westra WH, Donovan PI et al. Randomized prospective evaluation of frozensection analysis for follicular neoplasms of the thyroid. Ann Surg 2001, 233 (5):716-22.
Harding J, Sebag F, Sierra M et al. Thyroid surgery: postoperative haematoma – prevention
and treatment. Langenbecks Arch Surg 2006; 391:169-173.
73
97.
98.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.
Reeve T, Thompson NW. Complications of thyroid surgery: how to avoid them, how to
manage them, and observations on their possible effect on the whole patient. Worlds J Surg
2000; 24:971-975.
Testini M, Rosato L, Avenia N et al. The impact of single parathyroid gland
autotransplantation during thyroid surgery on postoperative hypoparathyroidism: a
multicenter study. Transplant Proc 2007; 39(1): 225-230.
Tartaglia F, Giuliani A, Sgueglia M et al. Randomized study on oral administration of
calcitriol to prevent symptomatic hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. Am J Surg 2005;
19(3): 424-429.
Kurukahvecioglu O, Karamercan A, Akin M et al. Potential benefit of oral calcium/vitamin D
administration for prevention of symptomatic hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. Endocr
Regul 2007; 41(1): 35-39.
Raffaelli M, De Crea C, Carrozza C et al. Combining early postoperative parathyroid
hormone and serum calcium levels allows for an efficacious selective post-thyroidectomy
supplementation treatment. World J Surg 2012;36(6):1307-1313.
De Pasquale L, Sartori PV, Vicentini L et al. Necessity of therapy for post-thyroidectomy
hypocalcaemia: a multi-centre experience. Langenbecks Arch Surg 2015;400:319-324.
Puzziello A, Rosato L, Innaro N et al. Hypocalcemia following thyroid surgery: incidence and
risk factors. A longitudinal multicenter study comprising 2,631 patients. Endocrine 2014; 47
(2): 537-42.
Hong JW, Roh TS, Yoo HS et al. Outcome with immediate direct anastomosis of recurrent
laryngeal nerves injured during thyroidectomy. Laryngoscope 2014 Jun;124(6):1402-8
Doran HE, England J, Palazzo F et al. British Association of Endocrine and Thyroid
Surgeons. Questionable safety of thyroid surgery with same day discharge. Ann R Coll Surg
Engl 2012; 94(8):543-547.
Materazzi G, Dionigi G, Berti P et al. One-day thyroid surgery: retrospective analysis of
safety and patient satisfaction on a consecutive series of 1571 cases over a three-year period.
Eur Surg Res 2007; 39(39): 182-188.
Famà F, Linard C, Patti R et al. Short stay hospitalization for benign thyroid surgery: a
prospective study. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2013;270:301-4.
Sorensen KR, Klug TE. Routine outpatient thyroid surgery cannot be recommended. Dan
Med J. 2015; 61(2). pii: A5016.
Wang TS, Cheung K, Roman SA et al. To supplement or not to supplement: a cost-utility
analysis of calcium and vitamin D repletion in patients after thyroidectomy. Ann Surg Oncol.
2011; 18:1293-9.
Docimo G, Tolone S, Pasquali D et al. Role of pre and post-operative oral calcium and
vitamin D supplements in prevention of hypocalcemia after total thyroidectomy. G Chir 2012;
33: 374–8.
Delbridge L. Selective rather than routine: using sound clinical judgment. Arch Surg 2012;
147:344.
Rosario PW, Mourão GF, Siman TL et al. A low postoperative nonstimulated serum
thyroglobulin level excludes the presence of persistent disease in low-risk papillary thyroid
cancer patients: implication for radioiodine indication. Clin Endocrinol 2014; doi:
10.1111/cen.12668.
Carty SE, Doherty GM, Inabnet WB 3rd et al. American Thyroid Association Statement on the
Essential Elements of Interdisciplinary Communication of Perioperative Information for
Patients Undergoing Thyroid Cancer Surgery. Thyroid 2012;22:395-9.
74
75
Scarica

Diagnostic, Therapeutic and Healthcare